CoastLine

CoastLine​, a call-in, variety news show airs Wednesdays and Thursdays from 12pm - 1pm on WHQR.

Every week, we’ll look into issues that matter in the Cape Fear Region. Host Rachel Lewis Hilburn will interview expert guests and invite you to join the conversation.

Tell us what topics you would like discussed on CoastLine. Email thoughts and suggestions to coastline@whqr.org.  

You can now subscribe to our CoastLine podcast on iTunes. Search WHQR-FM: CoastLine to hear our most recent shows. 

Remember, this is a LIVE broadcast so please call or email comments and questions to:

CoastLine phone:  910.343.1138 

Email:  coastline@whqr.org

Ways to Connect

https://www.cisbrunswick.org/
Communities In Schools, Brunswick County

In the Brunswick County School System, there are 19 schools.  Two academic years ago, in 2014-15, 158 kids dropped out of school.  The following year, 21 fewer kids – 137 -- dropped out.  That lowers the dropout rate less than a half a percentage point, but on a practical level, it means there are twenty-one more students that have a shot at getting their high school diploma. 

By Psychonaught (Own work) [CC0], via Wikimedia Commons

Wilmington, North Carolina is at the top of an unfortunate list.  One study published last year, based on analysis of numbers from the Centers for Disease Control, shows more than 11.5% of the population abuses opioids.  Opioid abusers tend to live in the rural south – according to the Castlight report

Marine Biology at the University of North Carolina – Wilmington is frequently held up as one of the highly-regarded programs there.  Life and Marine Sciences were identified by a New Hanover County economic development analysis two and a half years ago as one of the existing strengths for the Cape Fear region and one that should be exploited.

UNCW

As North Carolina legislators begin a new long session in Raleigh, both political parties have pointed to education as an area needing attention.  The first day of the session, Republican lawmakers filed a bill in the House to address class sizes.  That’s because last year, a newly-passed law reduced maximum class size – but came with no additional state funding.  That left some school systems looking down the barrel of cutting in other areas – such as arts and physical education.  That will be addressed this session.  And Democratic Governor Roy Cooper has listed education – particularly

Wikimedia Commons

When you think of an accessible space, you might picture a ramp to the side door of a building, big metal grab bars next to a toilet, or a button with a wheelchair insignia that automatically opens doors.  But a concept called Universal Design is gaining traction.

Google Earth

Every successful municipality will inevitably grapple with the push-pull of growth versus green space –  how to grow a tax base without over-developing a city.  Echo Farms, a development within the City of Wilmington, is at the center of this battle in the Cape Fear region. 

Encore

The man we meet on this edition of CoastLine is a bona fide Air Pirate -- convicted in absentia by the Nigerian government just after the civil war.  He was the first broadcast engineer on staff at WHQR.  He’s written a book of fiction called The Ship’s Cat.  And he acted in the notoriously – um – horrific film Death Bed:  The Bed that Eats.  He also helped to design the bed that eats. 

Guest:

From Cheese on Bread

Jeremy Vest has interviewed Karl Rove, Ben Affleck, John Stamos, and Al Franken – among others -- for an MTV show called How's Your News?.   He has been coached by Geraldo Rivera.  And he’s appeared as the lead character in a Western called Bulletproof Jackson – which became the subject of a separate documentary – Becoming Bulletproof.  That documentary was written about by the New York Times and distributed by Morgan Spurlock Productions. 

North Carolina ranks 9th in the nation for most racial progress:  that’s according to a new analysis published by WalletHub, a personal finance website that frequently publishes analyses based on demographic statistics.

University of South Carolina Press, 2016


UNCW Associate Professor Julie-Ann Scott-Pollock examines emodiment questions and stigma surrounding disabilities.
Marion Post Wolcott / Library of Congress

When you think about disability and how you define it, what comes to mind?  A child who doesn’t learn through conventional methods?  An older person who struggles to get groceries from the car to the front door?  Do you imagine a person in a wheelchair? 

One disability researcher says our binary view of ability or lack of it is misguided; ability spans a spectrum from Olympic-level athleticism to death – and we’re all somewhere on that spectrum.  On this edition of CoastLine, we explore how we look at disability and what impact those views have on all of us. 

Magnus Manske / Wikimedia Commons

This edition of CoastLine is about food.  But it's not about the world food supply, ethical or nutritional food choices, or even food deserts.  Nope.  In honor of the holiday season, including but not limited to the Winter Solstice, Christmas, Chanukah, Kwanza, Pancha Ganapati, Human Light Day, and Newtonmas, we are celebrating food .  And to help us do that, we have two of the most celebrated chefs in Wilmington.

Guests:

Robert Parr

North Carolina has a controversial history when it comes to its willingness to accept and plan for sea level rise.  In 2012, the state legislature enacted a multi-year moratorium on considering data from a science panel for future planning and policymaking.  That moratorium has since lifted and a new study out last year, looking at the next 30 years, is now accepted as a reasonable basis for policymaking.

National Park Service -- https://www.nps.gov/guge/learn/management/index.htm

The Gullah Geechee Cultural Heritage Corridor stretches from its northernmost point near Wilmington, North Carolina all the way south to Jacksonville, Florida.  Created by an Act of Congress in 2006, the ten-year-old Corridor is a work in progress.  

Gullah Geechee culture originates from West Africans brought to the United States as slaves and many of their traditions, including the language, continue through later generations. 

paws4people

Dogs and people — it's a profoundly deep connection that has evolved over millennia, and it's one that scientists are still studying. According to a report in National Geographic, researchers have found that dogs can read facial expressions, communicate jealousy, display empathy, and watch TV. Experts estimate these traits have evolved over the course of 11,000 to 16,000 years. 

Wikimedia Commons

A little more than a century ago, Jewish people around the world faced decisions that have proved critical in shaping the past century.  On this edition of CoastLine, we look at those decisions through the eyes of two historians who are launching a lecture series in January at the Temple of Israel’s Reibman Center in Wilmington.

Guests:

Carole Fink, Humanities Distinguished Professor of History Emerita, The Ohio State University;
Professor of History Emerita, University of North Carolina Wilmington

By Steven Nass - Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=38869847

A federal court ruled earlier this year that two of North Carolina’s congressional districts, drawn in 2011, were unconstitutional because they were racially gerrymandered.  That case is to be argued before the U.S.

OpenSource.com on Flickr Creative Commons - https://www.flickr.com/photos/opensourceway/4427310974/

Economic development is the way municipalities, counties, states, and nations improve the quality of life for its citizens.  Economic growth is one element and can be a metric for measuring that.  In pursuit that growth, communities often lay out a blueprint – a vision – that details how they would like to see that growth unfold. 

"Crazy Thanksgiving" by Louish Pixel on Flickr Creative Commons -- https://www.flickr.com/photos/louish/

Did you vote for Donald Trump, Hillary Clinton, Gary Johnson, or Jill Stein?

Are you pro-life or pro-choice?

How do you feel about immigration? Do you refer to people living in the United States illegally as illegal aliens or people who are undocumented?  

WHQR is proud to announce that our news team added seven top awards to the WHQR trophy case on November 12, 2016. The Associated Press and the Radio Television Digital News Association of the Carolinas held their joint annual awards, where WHQR's news team was recognized for outstanding work in the following category wins: 

AP Awards

Throughout election season, Donald Trump referred to the media as "dishonest and crooked." But that assessment is not limited to the President-elect. 

On this edition of the CoastLine Candidate Interviews, we hear from the three Democrats seeking seats on Brunswick County’s Board of Commissioners.

There are five members on the Board – one representing each district in Brunswick County.  The four-year terms are staggered, and elections are held every two years.  This year, Districts 3, 4, and 5 are in play. 

Today, we continue with our CoastLine Candidate Interviews, and on this edition, we’ll hear from two of the three Republicans seeking seats on Brunswick County’s Board of Commissioners.

On this edition of the CoastLine Candidate Interviews, we’ll hear from the two Democrats seeking seats on Brunswick County’s Board of Education.

There are five members on the Board – one representing each district in Brunswick County.  The four-year terms are staggered, and elections are held every two years.  In 2016, Districts 1, 2, and 4 have open seats.  No Democrats filed for District 1, however, which means that Republican Ed Lemon has no formal opposition.  Write-in candidates are permitted.

On this edition of the CoastLine Candidate Interviews, we meet one of three Republicans seeking three seats on Brunswick County’s Board of Education.

There are five members on the Board – one representing each district in Brunswick County.  The four-year terms are staggered, and elections are held every two years.  In 2016, Districts 1, 2, and 4 have open seats.  No Democrats filed for District 1, however, which means that Republican Ed Lemon has no formal opposition.  Write-in candidates are permitted.

http://www.ncleg.net/

On this edition of the CoastLine Candidate Interviews, we meet Representative Frank Iler, the Republican from Brunswick County who has served North Carolina’s House District 17 for three-and-a-half terms and is seeking a fourth.  We had also booked his Democratic challenger, Charles Warren.  Mr. Warren let us know a couple of days earlier that he could not appear due to an emergency. 

David Rouzer

On this edition of the CoastLine Candidate Interviews, we’re talking with David Rouzer.  He’s North Carolina’s  Republican Congressman from Johnston County in the 7th District who has served one term and is seeking a second.  Before winning a seat in the U.S. House of Representatives, David Rouzer served in the North Carolina Senate for two terms – representing the 12th district. 

On this edition of the CoastLine Candidate Interviews, we meet North Carolina Representative Susi Hamilton, a Democrat from New Hanover County, who has held the seat for three terms and is seeking a fourth. 

But first, we hear from her Republican challenger this November – Gerald Benton. 

https://www.facebook.com/sunger4nchouse/

On this edition of CoastLine Candidate Interviews, we meet Steve Unger, the Democrat who is challenging Chris Millis, the Republican incumbent, in North Carolina’s House District 16, which includes Pender County and the northwest corner of Onslow County. 

This is the second time Steve Unger has challenged Chris Millis for the seat. 

www.bcswan.net

On this edition of CoastLine, we’re taking the time to learn about two of the bonds that will appear on the November ballot.  One of those bonds would bring improvements and some facilities to the Brunswick County Schools System.  The other would develop and enhance parks and green space within the City of Wilmington. 

Segment 1

During the upcoming election, Brunswick County voters will be asked to vote on a $152 million school bond referendum. 

Guest:

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