Wilmington City Council

Courtesy City of Wilmington

In yesterday’s municipal elections, Wilmington’s three incumbent city council candidates kept their seats, beating out three challengers. Kevin O’Grady, Charlie Rivenbark and Earl Sheridan will all begin new four-year terms. Mayor Bill Saffo, who ran unopposed, will also continue to serve the city for another two-year term.

Last night’s race was a close one. It wasn’t until close to ten o’clock last night that incumbent Earl Sheridan, a political science professor at UNCW, pulled slightly ahead of Skip Watkins, a local financial advisor.

Kevin O'Grady: Wilmington City Councilman, 2013-2017

Nov 6, 2013
Courtesy City of Wilmington

In yesterday’s municipal elections, Wilmington’s three incumbent city council candidates kept their seats, beating out three challengers. Kevin O’Grady, Charlie Rivenbark and Earl Sheridan will all begin new four-year terms. Mayor Bill Saffo, who ran unopposed, will also continue to serve the city for another two-year term.

It was by a margin of mere percentage points, but O’Grady held a steady lead last night while results trickled in.

Courtesy City of Wilmington

In yesterday’s municipal elections, Wilmington’s three incumbent city council candidates kept their seats, beating out three challengers. Kevin O’Grady, Charlie Rivenbark and Earl Sheridan will all begin new four-year terms. Mayor Bill Saffo, who ran unopposed, will also continue to serve the city for another two-year term.

By 4 PM Tuesday afternoon, Marvin McFadyen, Director of the New Hanover County Board of Elections, predicted voter turnout would reach about 12% of registered voters. 

Derek Bickel is one of six candidates hoping to win one of three seats this November on Wilmington’s City Council. 

Six Wilmingtonians are running for three open spots on their city’s council. And curbing Wilmington’s highly publicized crime rate is a top priority for each. The hopefuls agree that higher police officer pay would fortify intervention efforts; however, they have disparate ideas when it comes to preventing the root causes of crime. The value of youth-oriented social services is the source of greatest contention.

During the seventies and eighties, Felix Cooper served as New Hanover County’s finance manager and later, its county manager. Following those sixteen years of local service, a subsequent stint as city manager of Key West in Florida, and several years of retirement, the Democrat is throwing his hat in the ring again.  This time, he’s vying for a seat on Wilmington’s City Council. And, Cooper is a major proponent of increased synergy between the city council and the county commission.

City of Wilmington

Earl Sheridan is the current Mayor Pro Tem of the City of Wilmington, and he’s running for a third term on City Council.

Skip Watkins says he’s dreamed of serving in public office his whole life. A father, financial advisor and longtime volunteer with the Cape Fear Festival and Expo and the Azalea Festival, Watkins cites frustration over Wilmington City Council’s recent efforts to acquire a minor-league baseball stadium as the catalyst that ultimately spurred him to run for a seat on the Council. If elected, Skip Watkins hopes to provide the City with a dose of what he describes as “fiscal guidance.”

City of Wilmington

Charlie Rivenbark is running for a fourth term on the Wilmington City Council. 

Pages