National

The Two-Way
1:16 pm
Tue June 11, 2013

He Broke The NSA Leaks Story, But Just Who Is Glenn Greenwald?

Glenn Greenwald, columnist/blogger/lawyer/advocate.
Kin Cheung AP

He's an advocate, an activist, a lawyer, a blogger, a columnist, an author and an award-winning investigative journalist.

Now, Glenn Greenwald is at the center of the stories about surveillance and data-collection programs being run by the National Security Agency.

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Money Coach
12:04 pm
Tue June 11, 2013

Interest Rates Up: Could Spell Uncertainty For Home Loans, Retirement

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Parenting
12:00 pm
Tue June 11, 2013

Father Knows Best: Advice For Modern Dads

Looking ahead to Father's Day this weekend, Tell Me More's parenting panel dishes some advice. Host Michel Martin is joined by some pros — Dan Bucatinsky, Lester Spence and Manny Ruiz — who answer listener questions about how best to parent in today's busy world.

National Security
11:53 am
Tue June 11, 2013

Can Privacy And Security Go Hand In Hand?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Education
11:53 am
Tue June 11, 2013

Graduation Rates Hit New High: Good News For Everyone?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Shots - Health News
11:47 am
Tue June 11, 2013

How CT Scans Have Raised Kids' Risk For Future Cancer

Use of CT scans has doubled for children under five and tripled for older children.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed June 12, 2013 6:40 am

Doctors are prescribing too many CT scans for children, a study says, even though they know that the radiation used in the tests increases children's lifelong risk of cancer.

Choosing other tests and dialing back the radiation used in the scans would prevent 62 percent of related cancers, according to Diana Miglioretti, a biostatistician at the University of California, Davis, who led the study.

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The Two-Way
7:53 am
Tue June 11, 2013

As NSA Leaker Disappears, Talk Of More To Come And Charges

Edward Snowden's revelations about National Security Agency have been front page news around the world, including in Hong Kong — where he was last seen.
Bobby Yip Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 10:05 am

The latest news about 29-year-old Edward Snowden and the secrets he has revealed about the nation's surveillance programs includes:

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Business
5:23 am
Tue June 11, 2013

Data Leak Could Undermine Trust In Government Contractor

Federal contractor Booz Allen Hamilton, headquartered in McLean, Va., employed Edward Snowden, the computer technician at the center of the controversy over leaks involving the National Security Agency.
Michael Reynolds EPA/Landov

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 11:56 am

In recent decades, a quiet revolution has been transforming the way Washington works.

Because the U.S. government does not have the workforce to complete all of its tasks, it employs private companies like Booz Allen Hamilton to do the work for it. Booz Allen is the company where Edward Snowden, who said he leaked secrets about the National Security Agency, most recently worked.

Over the past 25 years, this contract workforce has grown and plays a major role in the U.S. government, says Paul Light, a professor of public service at New York University.

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The Race Card Project: Six-Word Essays
3:18 am
Tue June 11, 2013

A Daughter's Struggle To Overcome A Legacy Of Segregation

Alabama Gov. George Wallace (right) blocks the door of the the Foster Auditorium at the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa, Ala., on June 11, 1963. Wallace, who had vowed to prevent integration of the campus, gave way to federal troops.
AP

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 9:13 am

As we head into the summer months, NPR is looking back to the summer of 1963, a momentous year in civil rights history. As part of NPR's partnership with The Race Card Project, which asks people to distill their thoughts on race to six words, Host/Special Correspondent Michele Norris is asking people who were on the front lines of history to share their memories and their thoughts on race in America today.

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Politics
3:18 am
Tue June 11, 2013

How The Senate Farm Bill Would Change Subsidies

Third-generation Oklahoma farmer Scott Neufeld says crop insurance is important to his family's business.
Tamara Keith NPR

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 3:40 pm

The Senate voted Monday to approve its version of the farm bill, a massive spending measure that covers everything from food stamps to crop insurance and sets the nation's farm policy for the next five years.

The centerpiece of that policy is an expanded crop insurance program, designed to protect farmers from losses, that some say amounts to a highly subsidized gift to agribusiness. That debate is set to continue as the House plans to take up its version of the bill this month.

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