National

The Protojournalist
11:13 am
Fri June 14, 2013

Dear NSA: Please Read This Email

Paul J. Richards AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri June 14, 2013 2:19 pm

To: The National Security Agency

From: The Protojournalist

Subject: Please feel free to read our email exchange with Wendy Nather, a high-tech analyst who focuses on security issues at 451 Research in Austin, Texas. Not that you need our permission.

Dear Wendy Nather,

Read more
The Two-Way
10:17 am
Fri June 14, 2013

Ignoring Racist Tweets, 11-Year-Old Nails National Anthem ... Again

Sebastien de la Cruz, known as San Antonio's Little Mariachi, sings the national anthem before the start of Game 4 of the NBA finals on Thursday.
Frederic J. Brown AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri June 14, 2013 3:24 pm

Something pretty magical happened at last night's NBA finals: Sebastien de la Cruz, the 11-year-old who sang the national anthem on Tuesday, was back on Thursday to prove his critics wrong.

Read more
The Two-Way
7:04 am
Fri June 14, 2013

U.S. Says Syria Crossed 'Red Line'; Now What?

A Syrian female rebel monitors the movement of Syrian government forces in the Sheikh Maqsud district of the northern Syrian city of Aleppo in April.
Dimitar Dilkoff AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri June 14, 2013 1:34 pm

  • NPR's Deb Amos On Morning Edition
  • NPR's Michele Kelemen On Morning Edition
(This post was last updated at 1:31 p.m. ET.)

On Thursday, the United States revealed that it now has "high confidence" that the Syrian regime had used chemical weapons against rebel forces.

Read more
StoryCorps
2:44 am
Fri June 14, 2013

A Second Chance For A Father And Foster Son

Adrian Hawkins (left) with his foster father, Horace Atwater Jr., at a visit to StoryCorps in Atlanta. Horace took in Adrian when he was 14 years old.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri June 14, 2013 10:50 am

In 2004, Horace Atwater Jr. took in Adrian Hawkins as a foster child. Adrian was a teenager at the time, "this little, skinny kid, about 14," Horace recalls. "You didn't really have any clothes. You had mismatched socks."

Adrian had lived a difficult life as a child. He lived in several group and foster homes before moving in with Horace. "I remember times being hungry, seeing drugs and all kinds of stuff," Adrian tells Horace at StoryCorps in Atlanta. "I mean, some things had to happen for me to be in foster care."

Read more
The Two-Way
7:16 pm
Thu June 13, 2013

Lost In 1968 Battle, Marine's Dog Tag Found Again

After a photo of Lanny Martinson's dog tag was placed on Facebook and elsewhere, Marines and veterans helped track him down. Martinson lost the tag in Vietnam in 1968.
Facebook

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 9:08 pm

Lanny Martinson was a 23-year-old Marine sergeant in Vietnam when he last held his dog tags. In the 45 years since, he thought they were gone forever, lost in the mad rush to save his life after he and other Marines walked into a minefield.

He'll soon be getting one of those dog tags back, after a network of people worked together to find the tag's owner. When they contacted him, Martinson was just at the point of filing papers to request new dog tags, all these years later.

Read more
It's All Politics
6:59 pm
Thu June 13, 2013

5 Things To Know About America's Fastest-Growing Counties

A worker guides a crane in Watford City, N.D. Oil production has tripled in five years, leading to rapid growth in some of the state's counties.
Matthew Staver Bloomberg via Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 8:16 pm

The U.S. Census Bureau released its list of the nation's 100 fastest-growing counties Thursday, and here's what we learned: They're mainly clustered in the South and West, and their rapid population gains are fueled by a wide variety of economic and cultural factors including the energy boom, military realignment, Hispanic immigration, student enrollment and changing retirement patterns.

Read more
Business
6:22 pm
Thu June 13, 2013

Unpaid No More: Interns Win Major Court Battle

Eric Glatt, a Georgetown Law student, poses on Wednesday, in Washington, D.C. Unpaid internships have long been a path of opportunity for students and recent grads. But a federal judge ruled this week that Fox Searchlight Pictures violated minimum wage and overtime laws by not paying interns who worked on production of the 2010 movie Black Swan. Glatt was one of the interns.
Alex Brandon AP

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 7:36 pm

A federal court in New York has ruled that a group of interns at Fox Searchlight Pictures should have been paid for their work on the movie Black Swan. The decision may have broad implications for students looking for their first job.

Eric Glatt filed the federal lawsuit against Fox. He says everyone always told him taking an unpaid internship was the way to get his foot in the door in the film industry.

At Fox, he worked as an unpaid accounting clerk, he says — filing, getting signatures, running checks and handling petty cash — but he was working for nothing.

Read more
All Tech Considered
5:52 pm
Thu June 13, 2013

Under The Radar: Some Pilots Of Small Drones Skirt FAA Rules

Pablo Lema shows off his quadcopter.
Steve Henn NPR

Originally published on Mon May 12, 2014 11:17 am

Unmanned drones aren't just a tool for governments anymore. By as early as this year, the Federal Aviation Administration expects to propose regulations opening up the use of small, unmanned airborne vehicles — or drones — for commercial use.

Tens of thousands of these little, civilian drones are sold and piloted by hobbyists in the United States every year. Right now these drones are flown almost exclusively for non-commercial uses by enthusiast like Pablo Lema. Lema spends weekends flying his quardracopter around the San Francisco Bay.

Read more
Around the Nation
5:28 pm
Thu June 13, 2013

Black Forest Fire The Most Destructive In Colorado's History

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 6:35 pm

The Black Forest wildfire near Colorado Springs, Colo., has now destroyed 360 homes, making it the most destructive fire in the state's history. It is zero percent contained.

Law
5:28 pm
Thu June 13, 2013

Supreme Court Rules Against Patents On Human Genes

A technician loads patient samples into a machine for testing at Myriad Genetics in Salt Lake City in 2002. The Supreme Court ruled Thursday that Myriad cannot patent the BRCA genes, which are tested to check a woman's risk for breast and ovarian cancer.
Douglas C. Pizac AP

Originally published on Fri June 14, 2013 6:03 pm

The U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday ruled that human genes cannot be patented, upending 30 years of patent awards granted by the U.S. Patent Office. The court's unanimous decision has enormous implications for the future of personalized medicine and in many ways is likely to shape the future of science and technology.

Read more

Pages