National

Business
5:35 pm
Wed March 13, 2013

Fast Fashion's Challenge: Making Money With 'Made In The USA'

American Apparel boasts that all of its products are made in the USA, primarily at its Los Angeles headquarters. Selling garments produced largely by machine, rather than by hand, has helped the company remain profitable.
Mark Ralston Getty Images

Originally published on Wed March 13, 2013 7:02 pm

In the world of fast fashion, two U.S.-based companies loom large: Forever 21 and American Apparel. Both are based in Los Angeles, but the two could not be more different.

American Apparel proudly boasts that the clothes it sells are "made in the USA." In contrast, Forever 21 subcontracts with factories all over the world.

Dov Charney, American Apparel's Canadian-American founder and CEO, has a reputation. "I knew from a very early age — in elementary school — that I was going to rub some people the wrong way," he says.

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Law
5:35 pm
Wed March 13, 2013

High Profile Rape Trial Of High School Football Players Begins In Ohio

Originally published on Thu March 14, 2013 9:04 am

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Testimony began today in a rape trail that has thrown a small Ohio town into the international spotlight. Two football players from Steubenville High School are accused of raping a 16-year-old girl during a night of partying last summer. Lawyers for the boys say the sex was consensual. The case has attracted widespread attention in part because of shocking photos, video and texts that circulated over the Internet.

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Around the Nation
5:34 pm
Wed March 13, 2013

Health Problems Compound For Aging Homeless

Tony Lithgow, 49, and Andrea Mayer, 51, live together on the streets of Baltimore. Researchers say the aging homeless population is due to younger baby boomers who came of age during the 1970s and '80s, when there were back-to-back recessions.
Kainaz Amaria NPR

Originally published on Wed March 13, 2013 8:27 pm

Tony Lithgow and Andrea Mayer have been living under a highway overpass in downtown Baltimore since last year. He's 49 and has been homeless on and off for eight years. She's 51 and has been homeless for 10 years.

Living on the streets has clearly taken a toll on the couple, both physically and mentally. While they're standing at a corner waiting for a free city bus to take them to a soup kitchen, Tony shouts at a passenger staring at them from a car stopped at the light.

"We're homeless!" he calls out to the man.

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Wisdom Watch
12:03 pm
Wed March 13, 2013

Write A Little Everyday, You'll Have A Book

Samantha Loomis Paterson

Originally published on Thu March 14, 2013 11:51 am

Katherine Paterson is the beloved author of many young adult novels, including Jacob Have I Loved, The Great Gilly Hopkins and Bridge to Terabithia.

The American Library Association recently honored her with the Laura Ingalls Wilder Award for her "substantial and lasting contribution to literature for children."

Paterson, who has been writing for a half-century, tells NPR's Michel Martin that despite all the awards she has received throughout the years, this one means a lot.

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Money Coach
12:03 pm
Wed March 13, 2013

How To Have Your 'First Retirement' At 32

Originally published on Wed March 13, 2013 1:34 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

We want to turn now to someone who is thinking about retirement in a very different way. Carl Seidman is in his early 30s, but just a few weeks ago, he quit his job as a consultant in Chicago and hopped on a plane to Chile. He's calling it his first retirement and he says you don't have to wait until you're 65 to retire either, and he's going to tell us more about that.

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Money Coach
12:03 pm
Wed March 13, 2013

When Retirement Goes Wrong

Originally published on Wed March 13, 2013 1:34 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Now, we want to take some time to talk about retirement. Later this hour, we will hear from someone who decided to retire at the advanced age of 32 and - no, his last name is not Buffett or Rockefeller or Gates. We'll ask him why and, equally important, how he managed to do this. That's coming up later this hour.

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Around the Nation
11:57 am
Wed March 13, 2013

Fighting Sexual Assault Seen As Military Betrayal

Originally published on Wed March 13, 2013 1:34 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Coming up, we have some dramatic stories about retirement. One, somebody who retired young, and I mean really young. And another about how even the best planned retirement can go wrong when life happens. We hope you'll find something useful in each of those conversations which is in just a few minutes.

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Shots - Health News
11:38 am
Wed March 13, 2013

Can Free Video Consults Make Parkinson's Care Better?

Most people can't talk with their doctors online, because of regulatory and funding issues.
iStockphoto.com

Why, you might ask, would a hoity-toity medical institution like Johns Hopkins be offering up free Web-based consults for people with Parkinson's disease?

To prove that it works.

Ray Dorsey, director for the Johns Hopkins Movement Disorders Center, is on a mission to convince America that videochats with doctors are as good or better than the traditional office visit.

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The Salt
8:58 am
Wed March 13, 2013

How To Find A Food Desert Near You

Food deserts mapped from coast to coast, plus Alaska and Hawaii.
USDA

Originally published on Thu March 14, 2013 1:30 pm

Want to know where you can't buy fresh, healthful food? The USDA has the map for you.

The feds' new Food Access Research Atlas lets you find out just where it's difficult to buy broccoli or bananas in counties across the U.S. Forget walking to the store in St. Louis, Minn., where most people live more than a mile from a grocery store. Ditto for Hyde, N.C., and Pushmataha, Okla.

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The Two-Way
8:08 am
Wed March 13, 2013

Steubenville Rape Trial Begins

Steubenville, Ohio.
Jason Cohn Reuters /Landov

The case has already been "tried" in the social media, as The New York Times writes.

But Wednesday in Steubenville, Ohio, a real court will be the setting as two high school football players in a town that's obsessed with high school football go on trial for the alleged rape of a 16-year-old girl last summer.

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