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Around the Nation
10:47 am
Mon July 8, 2013

Why Catastrophic Airline Crashes Have Become More Survivable

National Transportation Safety Board officials handed out this photo of the burnt shell of Asiana Flight 214 during their first assessment of the crash. Two people died Saturday and scores more were injured.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 1:06 pm

The Boeing 777 that crash-landed in San Francisco has one of the best safety records in the industry. In addition to the plane's solid reputation, many other factors helped save lives in Saturday's crash — from fire-rescue training to aircraft design.

If you look at pictures of the gutted, charred fuselage of Flight 214, you'd wonder how anybody made it out alive. All but two of the 307 passengers and crew survived. Both people killed were teenage girls from China.

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It's All Politics
10:39 am
Mon July 8, 2013

Texas' Looming Hispanic Shift Explained In 2 Charts

A bilingual sign outside a polling center ahead of local elections in Austin, Texas, on April 28.
John Moore Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 4:12 pm

NPR is taking a look at the demographic changes that could reshape the political landscape in Texas over the next decade — and what that could mean for the rest of the country.

Within a decade, Hispanics are projected to eclipse non-Hispanic whites as the largest race or ethnic group in Texas. It's a development that could someday shift the state's — or, given the size of Texas, even the nation's — politics.

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The Two-Way
10:01 am
Mon July 8, 2013

It Was A 'Horrific Honor' To Recover 19 Firefighters' Bodies

On Sunday in Phoenix, the 19 bodies of firefighters killed while battling a wildfire in central Arizona were driven to Prescott, where the "hotshot" team was based.
Christian Petersen Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 12:20 pm

"I don't want strangers going in and getting them out of there. I want to be the one that gets to go in there and get them out of there. It's a horrific honor to go in and do that."

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The Two-Way
8:14 am
Mon July 8, 2013

10 Killed In Crash Of Alaska Air Taxi

Police and emergency personnel stand near the remains of a fixed-wing aircraft that was engulfed in flames Sunday at the Soldotna Airport in Alaska.
Rashah McChesney Peninsula Clarion

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 2:11 pm

One of the worst civilian aviation accidents in the state in at least 25 years killed all 10 people aboard an air taxi in Alaska on Sunday, the Anchorage Daily News writes.

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The Two-Way
7:48 am
Mon July 8, 2013

Dramatic Crash Video Among Latest Clues In Asiana Accident

Asiana Flight 214, a Boeing 777 aircraft, after Saturday's crash at San Francisco International Airport.
NTSB/Contra Costa Times MCT/Landov

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 12:19 pm

  • On 'Morning Edition': NPR's Richard Gonzales reports

"Oh my God ... oh my God ... oh my God."

That was plane spotter Fred Hayes' reaction Saturday as he videotaped what turned out to be the crash of Asiana Airlines Flight 214 in San Francisco.

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Around the Nation
4:45 am
Mon July 8, 2013

NTSB Investigators Probe Clues Of Asiana Flight 214 Crash

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 5:02 am

More details are emerging about the crash of Asiana flight 214 at San Francisco International Airport on Saturday that killed two people. The Boeing 777 jet nearly stalled on its approach to land, and the flight crew tried to take corrective action just seconds before it hit the ground. There's also word the pilot, while having extensive flying experience, had only 43 hours on the 777.

Parallels
3:52 am
Mon July 8, 2013

EU-U.S. Trade: A Tale Of Two Farms

Farmer Richard Wilkins, a firm believer in genetically modified crops, examines the corn crop at his farm in Greenwood, Del. U.S. and EU officials begin talks Monday on an ambitious free-trade agreement. One stumbling block is agriculture. Unlike the U.S., the EU bans the cultivation of genetically modified crops.
Jackie Northam/NPR

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 2:12 pm

U.S. and EU officials begin talks Monday on an ambitious free-trade agreement aimed at generating billions of dollars of new trade. But negotiators must overcome barriers created by cultural and philosophical differences over sectors like agriculture. In Europe, the cultivation of genetically modified crops is banned, while in the U.S., they are a central part of food production. NPR's Jackie Northam visited a farm in Delaware and NPR's Eleanor Beardsley visited one in Burgundy, France, to look at those deep-seated differences. We hear from Jackie first.

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Around the Nation
4:58 pm
Sun July 7, 2013

New Handicapped Sign Rolls Into New York City

In the beginning of their project, Sara Hendren and Brian Glenney stuck their new design over existing handicapped signs around Boston.
Darcy Hildreth

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 12:37 pm

The handicapped sign is getting a new look — at least in New York City.

The initial design, created in 1968, depicted a person with no head in a wheelchair. The sign has changed since then — the figure eventually got a head — and now it's trying something new.

Sara Hendren, a Harvard graduate design student, is co-creator of a guerrilla street art project that replaces the old sign with something more active.

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The Two-Way
10:46 am
Sun July 7, 2013

Asiana Flight Tried To Abort Landing Seconds Before Crash

The wreckage of Asiana Flight 214, a Boeing 777 airliner, is seen after it crashed at the San Francisco International Airport Saturday. The crash-landing killed two teenage Chinese girls, the airline says.
Marcio Jose Sanchez AP

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 2:39 pm

Update at 5:54 p.m.

Asiana Airlines Flight 214 tried to abort its landing and come in for another try just 1 1/2 seconds before it crashed Saturday at San Francisco airport, killing two people and injuring dozens of others.

That was the information gleaned from the jetliner's cockpit voice recorder, the head of the National Transportation Safety Board said at a Sunday news conference. NTSB chief Deborah Hersman also said about seven seconds prior to impact, there was a call to increase speed.

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The Two-Way
10:44 am
Sun July 7, 2013

Runaway Train Explosion Still Ablaze In Quebec

Firefighters douse flames after a freight train loaded with oil derailed in Lac-Megantic in Canada's Quebec province on Saturday.
Francois Laplante-Delagrave AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 8:25 am

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