National

Race
12:04 pm
Thu July 11, 2013

Does It Help To Call People Out On Their Hate?

Brittney Cooper was on an airplane when, out of the corner of her eye, she caught alarming words on her seatmate's phone. The fellow passenger was texting a message about Cooper's race and weight. Host Michel Martin talks to Cooper about what she did next, and what she was hoping to accomplish.

U.S.
12:04 pm
Thu July 11, 2013

Is Owning A Home Still A Good American Dream?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Later in the program, we're going to talk about something that might have happened to you. Somebody says something personally insulting about you, you heard it. You probably also had a moment where you weren't quite sure what to do about it. We'll talk with a woman who found herself in that very situation, and we'll find out what she did. That's later. But first, we want to continue our conversation with the Secretary of Housing and Urban Development, Shaun Donovan.

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Economy
12:04 pm
Thu July 11, 2013

Housing Sec.: 'We Forgot How to Make Safe, Plain Vanilla Loans'

You may have noticed that houses are selling a little faster and prices are going up. But not everyone is feeling the benefits. Host Michel Martin speaks with U.S. Secretary of Housing and Urban Development, Shaun Donovan, about what happened, and what's next in the housing sector.

Race
12:04 pm
Thu July 11, 2013

Study: Whites Think Black People Feel Less Pain

Racial disparities exist, but what causes them can be complicated. Harvard anthropology student Jason Silverstein says it has to do with a lack of empathy. Host Michel Michel Martin talks with Silverstein about a Slate article he wrote titled, 'I Don't Feel Your Pain.'

The Two-Way
11:23 am
Thu July 11, 2013

Def Con Hacking Conference Puts Feds In 'Time-Out'

An image of the site promoting Def Con 21, a large annual gathering of hackers in Las Vegas. The meeting's leader is asking federal workers to stay away from this year's event.
Def Con

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 1:02 pm

As one of the world's largest gatherings of hackers, the Def Con conference has long welcomed experts from the security industry and the U.S. government, along with academics and hackers. But this year, Def Con's leader is asking federal workers to skip the event, due to recent revelations about U.S. electronic surveillance.

The request was announced Wednesday in a message titled, "Feds, we need some time apart," which was posted at the Def Con site. It reads:

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The Two-Way
11:17 am
Thu July 11, 2013

Paula Deen Comic To Be Published In Fall

The cover of Bluewater Productions' upcoming "Female Force: Paula Deen" comic book.
Courtesy of Bluewater Productions

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 11:39 am

Paula Deen, the celebrity cook who has seen her TV shows and corporate sponsorships disappear in recent weeks because of reports about her past use of the N-word, is going to be the star of a comic book this fall, a publisher says.

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Code Switch
11:07 am
Thu July 11, 2013

Dueling Stereotypes: Bad Asian Drivers, Good At Everything

Asians are bad drivers but can navigate roundabouts like this one in Shanghai, eh?
Tauno Tõhk via Flickr

Originally published on Wed February 12, 2014 4:09 pm

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NPR Cities: Urban Life In The 21st Century
10:17 am
Thu July 11, 2013

Join The Twitter Roundtable: What Makes A City 'Smart'?

Use #nprcities to join a Twitter conversation about smart cities and urban innovation.
NPR

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 3:10 pm

This year, the NPR Cities Project is covering the concept of "smart cities": how cities worldwide are experimenting with technology to solve all sorts of urban problems. Please join us as we tackle the issue of smart cities with a live Twitter chat on Thursday, July 11, from 11 a.m. to 12 noon EDT.

Policymakers hope implementing technological solutions to urban issues will help cities become more efficient, more user-friendly and more environmentally sustainable.

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Parallels
8:38 am
Thu July 11, 2013

What Should The U.S. Be Doing In Egypt?

Some Egyptian protesters felt the U.S. ambassador to Egypt, Anne Patterson, was too close to the recently deposed president, Mohammed Morsi. Demonstrators in Cairo carry banners denouncing her on June 30, three days before Morsi was ousted by Egypt's military.
Ed Giles Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 3:25 pm

Egypt's crisis has ignited a familiar debate over U.S. foreign policy where the combatants cluster around two basic viewpoints: The U.S. is doing too little, and the U.S. is doing too much.

So which is it? Is America shrewdly orchestrating events behind the scenes, or is it just an impotent bystander in the Egyptian drama? It depends on whom you ask.

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The Two-Way
8:16 am
Thu July 11, 2013

After Crash, Why Were Asiana Passengers Told To Stay Seated?

Passengers move away from Asiana Airlines Flight 214 on Saturday in San Francisco. This photo was taken by a passenger.
Eugene Anthony Rah Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Sun July 14, 2013 5:41 pm

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