National

Law
5:22 pm
Tue August 20, 2013

With Pot Legal In Washington, Will Buyers Stay Underground?

Seattle law enforcement's mellow attitude toward pot was on display at this year's annual Hempfest, where the cops were at the gate — handing out bags of Doritos.
Martin Kaste NPR

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 9:25 pm

In Washington state, regulators are putting the finishing touches on rules for the new state-sanctioned recreational marijuana market. And the man hired to help shape those rules is raising a warning to local law enforcement: toughen up on the black market.

Read more
The Two-Way
5:21 pm
Tue August 20, 2013

More College Students Rely On Federal Aid, Study Says

For the first time, a majority of students got federal help to attend college, according to a new U.S. survey. Here, people walk on the Columbia University campus in July.
Mario Tama Getty Images

The percentage of U.S. undergrads who rely on the federal government for financial aid soared above 50 percent in the most recent survey from the National Center for Education Statistics. The data show that for the first time, a majority of students got federal help.

NPR's Claudio Sanchez reports for our Newscast unit:

"The new figures from the National Center for Education Statistics shows that from 2007 to 2011, the percentage of undergraduate students who depend on federal loans and grants jumped from 47 percent to 57 percent.

Read more
All Tech Considered
5:16 pm
Tue August 20, 2013

How Vine Settled On 6 Seconds

About a year since launching, Vine says it has more than 40 million registered users.
Emmanuel Dunand AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 8:53 pm

Six seconds isn't a lot of time. If you were to read this sentence out loud, by the time you finished, six seconds would be up. But the brevity of Vine, the app that lets users make and share six-second video clips, has attracted 40 million registered users since its January 2013 launch.

Read more
The Salt
4:20 pm
Tue August 20, 2013

'Treme' Cookbook Captures The Flavor Of A Show And A City

Microwave pralines are easier to make than stovetop pralines, and just as tasty.
Ed Anderson Chronicle Books

Originally published on Wed August 21, 2013 11:34 am

If you find yourself craving New Orleans food, you could go there and melt in the sweltering heat for a dose of gumbo or praline bacon. Or you could settle in on your couch, as I've been doing, and torture yourself watching reruns of the HBO series Treme. It's set in post-Katrina New Orleans and, along with the music, it puts the city's food on center stage.

Read more
The Two-Way
3:21 pm
Tue August 20, 2013

A Day With Elmore Leonard And The White Castle That Wasn't

Elmore Leonard's writing desk at his home in Bloomfield Village, just outside Detroit. He wrote each page of his books by hand on canary yellow paper.
Noah Adams NPR

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 6:14 pm

Upon hearing news of the death of Elmore Leonard, NPR correspondent and former All Things Considered co-host Noah Adams recalls a day he spent with the crime writer in his hometown.

Three years ago, I rode with Elmore Leonard in the back of a rental car to see Detroit and remember what it once was. Much of it was sadly puzzling to him, especially the empty space where Tiger Stadium had been.

Read more
The Two-Way
12:55 pm
Tue August 20, 2013

Dick Van Dyke Can Still Laugh After His Car Burns To A Crisp

Dick Van Dyke's car after the fire. He's willing to sell it.
@iammrvandy

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 12:57 pm

We're glad to report that 87-year-old comic actor Dick Van Dyke is alive and well after some scary moments Monday on a Los Angeles freeway.

We're also glad to be able to say that he's still got his sense of humor.

Read more
Music
12:06 pm
Tue August 20, 2013

From Cuba To America, Arturo Sandoval Is An Ambassador For Jazz

Arturo Sandoval and Dizzy Gillespie perform.
Concord Music Group

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 4:17 pm

Cuban-born trumpeter Arturo Sandoval is set to receive the Presidential Medal of Freedom later this year for his contributions to the world of music. He's won nine Grammy awards and an Emmy. He's also collaborated with legends like Frank Sinatra and Johnny Mathis, and contemporary stars such as Justin Timberlake and Alicia Keys.

Read more
Education
12:06 pm
Tue August 20, 2013

Is It Time To Get Rid of IQ Tests In Schools?

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee. Michel Martin is away. And it's time for our weekly parenting roundtable. Every week we check in with a diverse group of parents to get a little common sense and some savvy advice. Today, we're talking about labeling school children according to their abilities, their strengths and their weaknesses. Schools have long used IQ tests and standardized tests of many varieties to group kids and teach each kid according to his or her abilities.

Read more
Your Money
12:06 pm
Tue August 20, 2013

Women Shortchanged In Retirement Earnings

The American workforce is graying. And while many people aren't saving enough for retirement, that's especially true for women. Guest host Celeste Headlee speaks with reporter Paul Solman and aging specialist Helen Dennis, about a gender gap in retirement earnings.

Parallels
11:49 am
Tue August 20, 2013

CIA's Acknowledgment Of Iran Coup Role Is Latest Revelation

Iranian Prime Minister Mohammad Mossadegh in October 1951. The CIA this week acknowledged publicly for the first time that it played a role in the coup that ousted Mossadegh.
AP

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 12:45 pm

The CIA isn't exactly known for its openness. But for a spy agency, it's been a gusher of information over the past week when it comes to old controversies.

The CIA has now acknowledged its role in the 1953 coup that deposed Iran's left-leaning Prime Minister Mohammad Mosaddegh. Few Iranians will be surprised. They have always believed Mosaddegh was ousted by U.S. and British interests, and those suspicions are a big part of Iran's mistrust of the West to this day.

The Iran revelation was not the only one.

Read more

Pages