National

The Two-Way
8:38 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Jobless Rate Ticks Down To 7.3 Percent; 169,000 Jobs Added

A recruiter for Cigna greets a job seeker at a career fair in Philadelphia over the summer.
Mark Makela Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 2:30 pm

The nation's jobless rate dipped to 7.3 percent in August from 7.4 percent in July as 169,000 jobs were added to public and private payrolls, the Bureau of Labor Statistics estimated Friday morning.

The figures were roughly in line with what economists had been expecting to hear.

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Politics
7:33 am
Fri September 6, 2013

What It's Like Living In A Bankrupt City

Some of the many boarded up store fronts along Weber Street in Stockton, Calif., in 2012. The Stockton City Council voted to declare bankruptcy last year, making it the largest city in U.S. history to enter Chapter 9 to that time.
Peter DaSilva EPA /Landov

Crime has been bad on the south side of Stockton. Katherine Anderson, a lifelong resident of the Northern California city, says she's almost gotten used to hearing shots fired in her neighborhood.

Stockton has long had a problem with drugs. But there's been more crime because Stockton is broke.

Until Detroit's recent filing, Stockton's bankruptcy was the largest in U.S. history. Given widespread police layoffs and retirements, the city's gang intervention and narcotics teams have both closed shop. The result was a murder rate that last year broke all local records.

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It's All Politics
7:18 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Q&A: How To Do Political Coverage Better In The Twitter Age

Reporters watch the final minutes of the presidential debate between President Obama and Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney last October in Denver.
Doug Pensinger Getty Images

Curious about how social media sped up news cycles, amplified trivial events on the trail and enabled Washington's "worst tendencies" during the 2012 presidential race, one of the nation's top young political reporters decided to take a deeper look.

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NPR Story
5:05 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Secretary Napolitano Finishes Up At Homeland Security

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 12:40 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Today is Janet Napolitano's last day as Secretary of the Department of Homeland Security. Napolitano is leaving Washington D.C., heading for California, to become at the end of this month, president of the University of California System. NPR's Brian Naylor sat down with Napolitano yesterday for a look back at her tenure as head of one of the government's largest and most complex departments.

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StoryCorps
2:53 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Remembering A Boss Who Led A Team To Safety On Sept. 11

Connie Labetti, 52, was able to escape one of the World Trade Center buildings on Sept. 11, 2001, thanks to her boss, Ron Fazio.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 1:46 pm

Connie Labetti worked on the 99th floor of the south tower — the second World Trade Center tower to be hit on Sept. 11, 2001.

She made it out of the building thanks to her boss, Ron Fazio. He, however, did not survive. Fazio was one of 176 Aon employees who died that day. He was 57.

"He's the reason I'm here, there's no question about it," 52-year-old Labetti says. "Most of us survived that day because of him."

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The Two-Way
7:16 pm
Thu September 5, 2013

The Other G-20 Drama: Obama And Brazilian President Rousseff

Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff attends the first working meeting of the G-20 summit in St. Petersburg, Russia, on Thursday.
Handout Getty Images

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 7:49 pm

While everyone has been focused on Syria, including the dramatic meeting of two world leaders at odds over the situation, there was another bit of drama unfolding Thursday at the G-20 summit in St. Petersburg, Russia:

President Obama was late to dinner apparently because he was busy trying to smooth over a conflict with Brazil.

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The Two-Way
6:39 pm
Thu September 5, 2013

German Police Raid Christian Sect For Alleged Child Abuse

View of the village of Klosterzimmern near Deiningen, Germany on Friday. The village is home to the religious community 'Zwoelf Staemme' ('Twelve Tribes').
Daniel Karmann EPA/Landov

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 1:31 pm

Two communities affiliated with a U.S.-founded Christian sect have been raided by German police, who removed 40 children after allegations of abuse.

Officials say they acted after receiving evidence of ongoing child abuse at the two communities in Bavaria belonging to the Twelve Tribes, according to Germany's Spiegel Online.

According to the BBC, more than 100 officers were part of the operation to remove the children, who were placed in temporary foster homes.

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Sports
6:10 pm
Thu September 5, 2013

Broncos, Ravens Pick Up Where They Left Off In NFL Opener

The NFL season kicks off Thursday night, with reigning champs the Baltimore Ravens taking on the Denver Broncos. Pro football has some new rules and the league just settled a multi-million dollar class action lawsuit with players.

Around the Nation
6:10 pm
Thu September 5, 2013

Finding A Sister City Is A Bit Like Dating

It seems most decent-sized cities in the U.S. have a "sister city" — a companion community in a foreign country. Some even have more than one. But how these cities end up selecting each other is a lot like the dating scene.

Health
6:10 pm
Thu September 5, 2013

Percentage Of U.S. Teens Using E-Cigarettes Doubles

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 5:21 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block. The percentage of middle and high school students who use electronic cigarettes has more than doubled. That's according to a report out today from the Centers For Disease Control and Prevention. As NPR's Patti Neighmond reports, federal health officials are worried about the safety and addictive potential of E-cigarettes.

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