National

The Two-Way
6:39 pm
Tue September 10, 2013

In Iowa, Blind People Can Carry Guns In Public; Not Everyone's A Fan

A debate is taking place in Iowa over the ability of people who are legally or completely blind to carry guns in public. The issue stems from a 2011 change in the state's gun permit rules, allowing visually impaired people to carry firearms in public.

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Code Switch
6:16 pm
Tue September 10, 2013

Harlem On Their Minds: Life In America's Black Capital

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 9:38 pm

The poet Langston Hughes liked to wryly describe the Harlem Renaissance — the years from just after World War I until the Depression when black literature and art flourished, fed by an awakening racial pride — as "the period when the Negro was in vogue." Note the past tense. Two new books published Tuesday explore the blossoming of black cultural life in two different decades.

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Around the Nation
6:05 pm
Tue September 10, 2013

New HIV Cases Spotlight Adult Film Industry's Testing System

Michael Weinstein of the AIDS Healthcare Foundation (left) at a press conference in February to introduce AB 332, a statewide bill to require condom use by adult film performers.
Bret Hartman AP

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 7:49 pm

Adult film production in California is now suspended after a number of performers tested positive for HIV. Four cases have been reported in the past few months, including one on Monday.

If ever there was an "I told you so moment" for the AIDS Healthcare Foundation, it's now. The organization has been campaigning for condoms to be mandatory during porn shoots. Last year, it sponsored a measure in Los Angeles County to that effect, which voters approved.

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The Two-Way
6:02 pm
Tue September 10, 2013

Study Says America's Income Gap Widest Since Great Depression

John Moore Getty Images

The gap between the 1 percent and the 99 percent is growing, according to an analysis of IRS figures by an international group of university economists, and it hasn't been so wide since 1928.

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The Salt
5:44 pm
Tue September 10, 2013

Small Plates To Join Olive Garden's Never-Ending Bowls

Olive Garden's chicken scampi dish is on the regular carb-heavy menu.
AnneCN Flickr

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 9:39 am

Should you want to super-size your meal (and boost your social status in the process), plenty of American restaurant chains would be more than happy to have you dine with them. Olive Garden, for one, is currently in the middle of a "Never Ending Pasta Bowl" promotion. According to the chain's Twitter feed, it has served more than 5.3 million bowls of "unlimited" pasta with soup and salad for $9.99 since Aug. 5.

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Education
5:18 pm
Tue September 10, 2013

After Newtown Tragedy, Some Schools Are All But Bulletproof

Dara Van Antwerp, an armed school resource officer, will be permanently stationed at Panther Run Elementary School in Pembroke Pines, Fla. Across the country, schools have increased security after the Sandy Hook Elementary School shootings in Newtown, Conn., last year.
Wilfredo Lee AP

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 6:05 pm

As parents send their kids off to school this fall, many are wondering what's been done since last year to make sure they're safe.

Many schools have embraced new security measures since the Sandy Hook Elementary School shootings, from uniformed police on hallway patrol to shatterproof laminated windows.

'How Could This Have Happened?'

Bob Gay of Newtown, Conn., has a tattoo on his arm of his daughter Josephine's footprints as a baby and the number "2560," for the number of days she was alive.

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Around the Nation
5:18 pm
Tue September 10, 2013

Birmingham Church Bombing Victims Honored By Congress

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 6:05 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Fifty years ago this Sunday, four African-American girls died when the Ku Klux Klan bombed a church in Alabama.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

The explosion at Birmingham's 16th Street Baptist Church was a seminal moment in the Civil Rights Movement. It horrified the nation and helped spur passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

SIEGEL: Today, the girls received one of the nation's highest civilian awards, the Congressional Gold Medal. House Speaker John Boehner led the ceremony.

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The U.S. Response To Syria
5:18 pm
Tue September 10, 2013

Senate Waits On Possible Diplomatic Solution In Syria

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 10:14 pm

The U.S. and its allies await details of Russia's proposal to place Syria's chemical weapons arsenal under UN supervision. Meanwhile, senior Obama administration officials are continuing to press for congressional approval of a potential military strike against the Bashar al-Assad regime for its alleged use of chemical weapons in August.

Environment
5:18 pm
Tue September 10, 2013

Dust Bowl Worries Swirl Up As Shelterbelt Buckles

A Dust Bowl farmer digs out a fence post to keep it from being buried under drifting sand in Cimarron County, Okla., in 1936.
Arthur Rothstein Library of Congress

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 6:39 pm

In the 1930s, the Dust Bowl ravaged crops and helped plunge the U.S. into an environmental and economic depression. Farmland in parts of Texas, Kansas, Nebraska and the Dakotas disappeared.

After the howling winds passed and the dust settled, federal foresters planted 100 million trees across the Great Plains, forming a giant windbreak — known as a shelterbelt — that stretched from Texas to Canada.

Now, those trees are dying from drought, leaving some to worry whether another Dust Bowl might swirl up again.

An Experiment That Worked

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NPR Story
5:18 pm
Tue September 10, 2013

NASCAR Nastiness Results In Sport's Biggest Fine Ever

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 6:05 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Finally this hour, NASCAR nastiness. This past Saturday, one team appeared to pull out all the stops to rig a big race. One driver spun out his car, and another took an unnecessary pit stop. Both moves helped advance their teammate to the playoffs. NASCAR fined their team - Michael Waltrip Racing - $300,000, and suspended their general manager indefinitely.

Now, this is the biggest fine in NASCAR history, according to Nate Ryan. He's a senior motorsports reporter for USA Today Sports. He joins us from Charlotte, N.C. Hey there, Nate.

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