National

Code Switch
5:42 pm
Tue November 5, 2013

Fla. School District Trying To Curb School-To-Prison Pipeline

In 2010 and 2011, there were more than 1,000 school-related arrests in Broward County. Nearly three-quarters of them were for non-violent misdemeanors.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue November 5, 2013 8:57 pm

In Florida, one of the nation's largest school districts has overhauled its discipline policies with a single purpose in mind — to reduce the number of children going into the juvenile justice system.

It's a move away from so-called "zero tolerance" policies that require schools to refer even minor misdemeanors to the police. Critics call it a "school to prison pipeline."

Civil rights and education activists say the policy can be a model for the nation.

Read more
The Two-Way
5:14 pm
Tue November 5, 2013

Apple's Decision To Make Glass In Arizona Will Create Hundreds Of Jobs

Apple has bought a factory in Arizona that will be re-purposed to make sapphire glass. The material is used in the iPhone 5s, seen here, as well as in the wristwatch industry.
Andy Wong AP

Technology giant Apple is buying a large manufacturing space in Arizona, where high-tech glass for its devices will be produced. The move is being hailed in Arizona, where the economy remains slowed by the U.S. housing market crisis.

From Phoenix, Mark Moran of member station KJZZ reports for our Newscast unit:

Read more
Environment
4:56 pm
Tue November 5, 2013

Thanks To Parasites, Moose Are Looking More Like Ghosts

A large bull moose is inspected by a hunter at a weigh station in Maine.
Robert F. Bukaty AP

Originally published on Tue November 5, 2013 6:48 pm

The news for moose is not good across the country's northern tier and in some parts of Canada. A recent and rapid decline of moose populations in many states may be linked to climate change, and to the parasites that benefit from it.

In Minnesota, moose populations have dropped from a high of more than 12,000 two decades ago to fewer than 3,000 now. Moose in some parts of Manitoba have declined by 50 percent and more.

Read more
Code Switch
4:37 pm
Tue November 5, 2013

As City Grapples With Murder Rate, Police Chief Reaches Out

Just months after Wade Ingram became police chief in Gary, Ind., in January 2012, he began an unusual initiative: visiting the family of each of the city's homicide victims.

That's meant many visits for Ingram.

Read more
The Two-Way
2:55 pm
Tue November 5, 2013

Charlie Trotter, Famous Chicago Chef, Has Died At 54

Chef Charlie Trotter, who helped revitalize Chicago's culinary reputation, has died at age 54. He's seen here at the 2006 International Gastronomy Summit in Madrid.
Pierre-Philippe Marcou AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 5, 2013 5:04 pm

Charlie Trotter, whose eponymous Chicago restaurant became an institution and helped pave the way for innovative small dishes that featured fresh and unique food, has died at age 54.

Read more
Shots - Health News
2:35 pm
Tue November 5, 2013

Wondering If You Need A Strep Test? Crowdsourcing Might Help

Wouldn't it be nice to be able to skip the strep test sometimes?
iStockphoto.com

Most sore throats aren't strep. But because strep bacteria can in rare cases cause rheumatic fever, people often feel like they should get tested for possible strep infection.

It might be possible to skip that step someday by checking whether your neighbors have been getting strep throat, researchers say. Aside from reducing the cost and inconvenience of needless clinic visits, the neighborhood strep check could reduce the risk of being needlessly treated with antibiotics.

Read more
The Two-Way
12:01 pm
Tue November 5, 2013

Police Weren't 'Minutes' Behind Los Angeles Shooting Suspect

Paul Ciancia.
FBI Getty Images

Tuesday brings word that some heartbreaking headlines from Monday apparently weren't correct. We'll try to set things straight.

Monday, reports such as these about Friday's shooting at Los Angeles International Airport were getting lots of attention:

Read more
U.S.
11:54 am
Tue November 5, 2013

Ban The Box: Some Companies Stop Asking Job Applicants About Criminal History

Big box retailer Target said it will remove questions about prior arrests on its job applications, but many companies still ask. Host Michel Martin speaks with Madeline Neighly from the National Employment Law Project and Elizabeth Milito from the National Federation of Independent Businesses about the pros and cons of the practice.

Law
11:54 am
Tue November 5, 2013

Does Equal Justice For All Include The Poor?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Today, we're going to spend some time talking about some important issues in criminal justice, including what happens after people have served their time. Retailer Target recently announced that it would remove questions about an applicant's criminal history from the initial job applications, but many companies still do it. We'll talk about why this has become a growing focus of advocates.

Read more
Books
11:54 am
Tue November 5, 2013

Going On 'The Baby Chase' From Arizona To India

Stevy Fletcher St. Martin's Press

Originally published on Tue November 5, 2013 4:23 pm

Many couples who struggle with infertility say they would go to the ends of the earth to have a child. Some use surrogate mothers in the United States, but the high cost and legal complications keep that option out of reach for many families. So some Americans are going global --to countries like India– to make it happen.

Read more

Pages