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One of the four key points agreed to by President Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un is to help repatriate the remains of Americans killed in action during the Korean War.

"The United States and the DPRK commit to recovering POW/MIA remains, including the immediate repatriation of those already identified," the statement reads.

It may not have been the focus of the summit, but Korean War vets and their families were hoping the issue would come up.

It was a hug that put sportsmanship on full display.

A lot hung on the game: The winning team would play for the Minnesota state championship for baseball. Mounds View, a public high school in a Minneapolis suburb, was leading Totino-Grace, a nearby Catholic high school.

Totino-Grace's Jack Kocon stepped up to bat, meeting eyes with pitcher Ty Koehn, his longtime friend. Koehn, reportedly the star player of his team, the Mustangs, struck out Kocon to win the game and move ahead to the championship.

Updated at 5:20 p.m. ET

After a dramatic Stanley Cup win last Thursday, Washington, D.C., hockey fans filled their streets with red and white for their victory parade.

The San Juan National Forest in southwestern Colorado is closed to visitors on Tuesday because of a large wildfire and dry, warm conditions that raise the risk of further blazes. Forests are also closed in Arizona and New Mexico in areas that are suffering from a severe drought.

Evacuation orders are in effect, as Colorado Public Radio reports on the blaze known as the 416 Fire:

President Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un signed a statement Tuesday promoting "mutual confidence building" to "promote the denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula." In the statement, the leaders outlined four commitments: establishing relations, building a "lasting a stable peace regime on the Korean Peninsula," working toward denuclearization and recovering POW/MIA remains.

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A long-shuttered rail depot that had become a symbol of Detroit's decline will now be part of its resurgence. The building's new owner will be Ford Motor Company, an automaker with a story that is inseparable from Detroit's.

Former NPR President Douglas J. Bennet Jr., who took over a troubled organization in 1983 and led it to stability during his decade at the helm, has died, his family announced. He was 79.

His death Sunday was announced on Twitter by his sons, U.S. Sen. Michael Bennet of Colorado and James Bennet, the editorial editor of The New York Times, and by his daughter, Holly. No cause of death was reported.

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Updated at 11:19 p.m. ET

Attorney General Jeff Sessions is imposing sharp new limits on who can get asylum in the United States, ruling in a closely watched case that most migrants fleeing domestic abuse or gang violence will not qualify.

"Asylum was never meant to alleviate all problems — even all serious problems — that people face every day all over the world," Sessions said Monday in a speech before immigration judges in Virginia.

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The Tony Awards on CBS last night had performances from some of the biggest new musicals on Broadway - "Mean Girls," "Frozen," "The Band's Visit." Then there was a song from a Broadway classic sung by high schoolers that stole the show.

The Obama-era federal regulations known as net neutrality are done – at least for now. Though whether anything will change depends on where you live, and what internet service providers choose to do with their newfound freedom.

An Air Force officer who deserted the military in 1983 has been located in California, where he was living under a false name, according to authorities.

The Air Force Office of Special Investigations announced late last week that William Howard Hughes Jr. had been apprehended "without incident."

There's more rain falling on some parts of the U.S. than there used to be, and many towns just aren't ready for the flooding that follows.

Ellicott City, Md., is one such community. Nestled in a valley west of Baltimore, the town was founded in 1772, and some Revolutionary War-era buildings still house businesses along the narrow main street in historic downtown. It also sits at the confluence of three streams.

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Updated 6:34 p.m. ET

An ideologically split U.S. Supreme Court Monday upheld Ohio's controversial "use-it-or-lose-it" voting law by a 5-to-4 margin. The law allows the state to strike voters from the registration rolls if they fail to return a mailed address confirmation form, and don't vote for another four years, or two federal election cycles.

Failure to vote

IHOP — the International House of Pancakes — is changing its name to IHOb and will now feature burgers, the company said in a tweet that was not posted on April Fool's Day. It remains to be seen whether the change will be permanent or merely a flash in the pan (cake) to promote hamburgers.

There are now more than 10,000 migrant children in U.S. government custody.

These are teenagers who fled violence in Central America. And children who were separated from their parents after they crossed the U.S.-Mexico border illegally.

How the children should be cared for and what happens to them is part of a growing clash between the Trump administration and advocates.

One of these young migrants made the long trek from El Salvador last year and turned herself in to U.S. authorities at the border.

If a shopper clicks "buy" for a product that costs $1,000 or more, it's twice as likely to be a man than a woman. That's one of the results revealed in a new NPR/Marist poll about online shopping.

Oil operations in Alaska are specially designed for freezing conditions. But as the climate changes, the state is warming twice as fast as the rest of the country. That poses a challenge for the oil industry, and a boon for Alaska businesses that are creating products to help it cope.

Brian Shumaker is one such entrepreneur who knows how tricky it can be to operate in the Arctic, where he once did some engineering work for oil companies.

On New Year's Eve, back in 2012, Savannah Eason retreated into her bedroom and picked up a pair of scissors.

"I was holding them up to my palm as if to cut myself," she says. "Clearly what was happening was I needed someone to do something."

Her dad managed to wrestle the scissors from her hands, but that night it had become clear she needed help.

"It was really scary," she recalls. "I was sobbing the whole time."

Savannah was in high school at the time. She says the pressure she felt to succeed — to aim high — had left her anxious and depressed.

The Tony Awards felt a little different this year than they have recently. It was a year without a Hamilton or a Dear Evan Hansen; there was no one original, out-of-nowhere show that came into the Tony Awards as a pop phenomenon. In fact, all four of the four nominated musicals were adaptations of existing properties: SpongeBob SquarePants, Disney's Frozen and the non-musical films Mean Girls and The Band's Visit.

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#MeToo At The Southern Baptist Convention

Jun 10, 2018

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