National

Around the Nation
4:44 am
Wed November 20, 2013

Early Warnings Saved Lives In Weekend Storms

Originally published on Wed November 20, 2013 7:34 am

The death toll from Sunday's tornado outbreak across the Midwest stands at eight. Many of those who witnessed the devastation say they're shocked that number isn't higher. Early warnings delivered by text message may have helped limit the casualties.

All Tech Considered
3:23 am
Wed November 20, 2013

Profit, Not Just Principle, Has Tech Firms Concerned With NSA

Google and five other companies sent a letter last month to members of the Senate Judiciary Committee supporting legislation to reform NSA surveillance programs.
Marcio Jose Sanchez AP

Originally published on Thu December 12, 2013 12:51 pm

Along with the privacy advocates and the national security establishment, there is another set of players with strong views on NSA surveillance programs: U.S. tech companies.

Google and five other companies weighed in on the surveillance debate last month, sending a letter to members of the Senate Judiciary Committee, supporting legislation to reform National Security Agency surveillance programs.

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Around the Nation
3:18 am
Wed November 20, 2013

The Art Of Letter-Writing Isn't Lost On These Scribblers

Do you write letters anymore? A few determined people are doing their best to keep them arriving in U.S. mailboxes.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed November 20, 2013 11:00 am

When was the last time you wrote a letter?

If the answer is "not recently," then you can count yourself among the millions of Americans who just don't write letters anymore. The post office says the average American home receives only one personal letter about every two months.

But there are a few determined people who are doing their best to wreck that average.

"It's becoming a lost art," says Deb Bruzewski.

Every day she curls up on her plaid couch in her home in Auburn, Mich., to write a few of her 60 letters for the week.

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The Two-Way
2:47 am
Wed November 20, 2013

First Satellite Developed By High Schoolers Sent Into Space

NASA's PhoneSat, a 4-by-4-inch CubeSat satellite, will use an Android smartphone as its motherboard. It was among the 29 satellites launched Tuesday from Wallops Island, Va. Another miniature satellite, developed by high school students, also was on board.
Dominic Hart AP

Originally published on Thu December 12, 2013 12:51 pm

The first satellite ever developed by high school students to make it to space is believed to be orbiting Earth after getting a ride aboard a U.S. military rocket Tuesday night from Wallops Island, Va.

Fittingly, perhaps, you can send it a text message.

The satellite, using a voice synthesizer, is built to transform that text into an audio message that can be heard over certain radio frequencies around the globe, and in different languages.

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The Salt
6:38 pm
Tue November 19, 2013

What's Trending In Food Magazines? Thanksgiving Classics

Three food magazines featured a pumpkin pie finished with a bruleed top for Thanksgiving this year, according to The Bitten Word.
Courtesy of TheBittenWord.com

Originally published on Tue November 19, 2013 6:53 pm

For many of us, Thanksgiving is just not the same without turkey, mashed potatoes, cranberry sauce and pumpkin pie. In other words, tradition tends to trump trendy.

Yet food magazines always encourage going beyond the usual suspects. And who among us has time to try them out in advance of Thanksgiving?

Zach Patton and Clay Dunn, that's who. They're the married couple behind the food blog The Bitten Word.

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The Two-Way
6:33 pm
Tue November 19, 2013

Divided U.S. Supreme Court Leaves Texas Abortion Law In Effect

The U.S. Supreme Court has refused to block abortion restrictions that are included in a new Texas law that was enacted after vigorous debate this year. The law is the subject of an ongoing legal battle.

Texas officials have defended the law in lower federal courts, with Planned Parenthood and other opponents winning an initial victory that was overturned days later by a U.S. Court of Appeals.

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The Two-Way
6:25 pm
Tue November 19, 2013

Postal Service Hopes 'Harry Potter' Stamps Spell Revenue

The cash-strapped U.S. Postal Service hopes its new Harry Potter stamps will spark enthusiasm among a new generation of stamp collectors.
USPS

Originally published on Wed November 20, 2013 6:10 am

Hold onto your owls, Harry Potter fans. The U.S. Postal Service is hoping you'll send your letters with one of 20 new Potter-themed stamps it unveiled Tuesday.

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The Two-Way
6:10 pm
Tue November 19, 2013

Florida Rep. Trey Radel Charged With Cocaine Possession

Rep. Henry "Trey" Radel, R-Fla., shown on Capitol Hill.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Tue November 19, 2013 8:22 pm

Florida Rep. Henry "Trey" Radel is being charged with cocaine possession and faces arraignment on Wednesday in Washington, D.C.

Authorities say the freshman Republican was found in possession of cocaine on Oct. 29, a misdemeanor offense, but provided no other details.

NPR's Tamara Keith says the charge carries a statutory maximum sentence of 180 days of imprisonment and/or a fine of $1,000.

Radel, 37, represents Florida's 19th District, which covers parts of the Gulf Coast, Fort Myers and Naples.

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Around the Nation
5:54 pm
Tue November 19, 2013

Iconic Sheep Return To Tucson Mountains, But Is It For Good?

The last desert bighorn sheep that roamed the mountains above Tucson, Ariz., died in the 1990s, the victim of human encroachment, mountain lions, and fire suppression. Now, the iconic Southwest animal — picture the Dodge Ram's grille — is back. A herd of 31 was released Monday morning after being transplanted over the weekend from the Yuma area in the far west of the state. Why would the sheep survive this time?

Energy
5:54 pm
Tue November 19, 2013

California, Colorado Consider Tough Oil And Gas Regulations

Colorado and California both just proposed new regulations for oil and gas production in their states. Both states have been pushed by environmental concerns to establish rules tougher than federal requirements. If Colorado's proposal goes ahead, it would be the first state in the nation to directly regulate methane. California also says its proposed rule would be the toughest in the nation. It regulates the engineering technique called hydraulic fracturing, or fracking.

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