National

NPR Story
2:21 pm
Fri November 29, 2013

As HealthCare.Gov's Deadline Approaches, What Will Be Ready?

Originally published on Fri November 29, 2013 6:49 pm

Transcript

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Ari Shapiro. Tomorrow is judgment day for healthcare.gov. The Obama administration has repeatedly said that by November 30, the troubled website will be up and running for the vast majority of users, and officials say they're on track to reach that goal.

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The Two-Way
2:14 pm
Fri November 29, 2013

Obama Visits Immigration Activists

President Obama meets Friday with immigration activists on the National Mall in Washington.
Leslie E. Kossoff/Pool EPA/Landov

Originally published on Fri November 29, 2013 3:55 pm

President Obama visited immigration activists in Washington on Friday, telling them there is still time for the House to pass legislation that would overhaul the nation's immigration system.

Obama stopped by a tent on the National Mall where some activists have been abstaining from food for the past 18 days. He was accompanied by first lady Michelle Obama.

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The Two-Way
10:24 am
Fri November 29, 2013

Man, Dog Reunited 9 Days After Tornado Flattened Ill. Town

A happy twist of events: Jacob Montgomery and Dexter are reunited.
Courtesy of the Illinois National Guard

Originally published on Fri November 29, 2013 10:45 am

Jacob Montgomery's apartment was destroyed when a tornado ripped through the town of Washington, Ill., on Nov. 17.

Montgomery, an MP in the Illinois National Guard, survived, but he was separated from his 6-month-old pit bull named Dexter.

Despite searching through the wreckage several times, he couldn't find the puppy. So Montgomery posted pictures of Dexter on social media in hopes of finding him.

On Tuesday — nine days later — something amazing happened.

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The Two-Way
7:57 am
Fri November 29, 2013

After Thanksgiving, Americans Pursue Another Tradition — Shopping

People enter Macy's Herald Square store after opening its doors at 8 p.m. on Thanksgiving Day in New York City.
Kena Betancur Getty Images

Originally published on Fri November 29, 2013 5:21 pm

Black Friday — the day on which Christmas shopping starts in earnest for many Americans — may have started on Thanksgiving Day this year, but it gave many shoppers extra time to hunt for deals.

NPR's Sonari Glinton spoke to shoppers in Colorado Springs, Colo., where people were camped out Thursday to get deals at the local Target.

"Do you think I need sweaters at Kohl's? No!" Janine Reed said. "But they're 10 bucks. You think I'm going to get one? Yeah – just 'cause."

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Politics
6:39 am
Fri November 29, 2013

Tax Break For Mass-Transit Commutes May Soon Be Slashed

Commuters wait on the platform as a Metro-North train arrives in Bridgeport, Conn.
Craig Ruttle AP

Originally published on Fri November 29, 2013 3:57 pm

Unless Congress acts quickly, taking mass transit to work is about to get more expensive for some people.

For the past four years, public transportation users and people who drive their cars to work and pay for parking have been able set aside up to $245 a month in wages tax free if they're used for commuting costs or workplace parking.

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StoryCorps' National Day Of Listening
2:50 am
Fri November 29, 2013

An Abuse Survivor Finds Family In A Special Teacher

When he was being abused, Rogelio Martinez says his teacher, Lisa Moya King, showed him that he was not alone.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri November 29, 2013 3:53 pm

Friday is the National Day of Listening, a chance to sit down with a loved one, turn on an audio recorder and ask that person about his or her life. You can find tips on how to record your conversation at nationaldayoflistening.org.

When Rogelio Martinez enrolled in Lisa Moya King's dance class in high school, his father had been deported. Rogelio was bouncing around among family members — and he was being abused.

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U.S. Commutes: The Way We Get To Work
2:46 am
Fri November 29, 2013

Epic Commutes Face Those Caught In Public Transit Puzzle

It takes Chicago resident Sarah Hairston two hours to go 15 miles to get to her part-time job.
David Schaper NPR

Originally published on Fri November 29, 2013 11:42 am

It's a sign of the times: More people are commuting for more than an hour to get to work, and many of the longest commutes are at least partially on public transportation.

Take Sarah Hairston's commute from her apartment on Chicago's South Side to her part-time job at a shelter for homeless teens on the north side of town.

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Shots - Health News
4:02 pm
Thu November 28, 2013

Breaking Up With HealthCare.gov Is Hard To Do

Lara Imler has tried to cancel her enrollment on HealthCare.gov, but to no avail.
Annie Feidt Alaska Public Radio Network

Originally published on Thu November 28, 2013 4:43 pm

Enrolling in HealthCare.gov is not easy, and it's been particularly difficult in Alaska. Just 53 people enrolled in the first month.

Anchorage hair stylist Lara Imler is one of the few who got through, as we previously reported. But Imler discovered problems with her application, and now she wants to cancel her enrollment.

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History
4:02 pm
Thu November 28, 2013

'Thanks' To The Woman Who Helped Make A November Thursday Special

This portrait of Sarah Josepha Hale, painted by James Reid Lambdin, hangs in Newport, N.H., where she was born.
Jim Cole AP

Originally published on Thu November 28, 2013 6:39 pm

Thursday's holiday has Sarah Josepha Hale to thank for helping it get national recognition.

Thanksgiving before 1863 was something of a moveable feast, with states honoring the holiday at various times or not at all. But as the Civil War dragged on, Abraham Lincoln needed a way to unite the country. And Hale, a prominent magazine editor, persuaded him to declare a national holiday.

Hale, who was from New Hampshire, was a prolific writer of biographies, cookbooks, novels, editorials and volumes of poetry, including the children's rhyme "Mary Had a Little Lamb."

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It's All Politics
2:45 pm
Thu November 28, 2013

Thanksgiving: A Very Brief Political History

President George W. Bush paid a surprise Thanksgiving visit to American troops in Baghdad on Nov. 27, 2003.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Of all the things Americans traditionally associate with Thanksgiving — turkey, family, football — politics doesn't rate high on the list.

But the national holiday and the political world have intersected at times and generated some headlines to remember.

Here are a few memorable Thanksgiving political moments:

Franksgiving (1939)

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