National

Shots - Health News
3:27 am
Mon December 23, 2013

Colorado Takes Health Plans To People Shopping For Groceries

The Colorado health exchange van stops at a shopping center in Fort Collins.
Eric Whitney for NPR

Originally published on Mon December 23, 2013 11:38 am

Despite White House and state efforts to promote the Affordable Care Act, some people still don't have health insurance, or any idea how to sign up for it.

Take Corryn Young, a 32-year-old dental hygienist in Fort Collins, Colo. She knows she needs to get health insurance but is a little vague on the details.

"What my income would qualify me for, when I need to be signed up, what type of deductibles they have to offer — that kind of stuff overwhelms me," Young says.

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Energy
3:24 am
Mon December 23, 2013

Could Big Batteries Be Big Business In California?

Strong gusts in Palm Springs, Calif., generate plenty of energy, thanks to turbine farms. But being able to store all of that energy is just as important.
Kevork Djansezian Getty Images

Originally published on Mon December 23, 2013 11:12 am

The California Public Utilities Commission has called on utilities and private companies to install about $5 billion worth of batteries and other forms of energy storage to help the state power grid cope with the erratic power supplied by wind and solar energy.

The need to store energy has become urgent because the state is planning to get a third of its electricity from renewable sources by the end of the decade. And the shift in strategy could open up some big opportunities for small startups, including one called Stem.

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Business
2:30 am
Mon December 23, 2013

After Target's Data Breach, Customer Incentive Disappoints

Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Mon December 23, 2013 9:06 am

Target is trying to get back in its customers' good graces after a massive data breach affecting some 40 million credit and debit account holders. The giant retail chain offered its customers a 10 percent discount over the weekend as an act of atonement, but business was said to be down anyway.

The breach affected customers who used their credit and debit cards at one of Target's 1,750 stores during a three-week period after Thanksgiving.

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Weekends On All Things Considered Podcast
7:54 pm
Sun December 22, 2013

A Pinball Monopoly, Camel Trekking In Texas, Charles Dickens' Mistress

  • A Pinball Monopoly, Camel Trekking In Texas, Charles Dickens' Mistress

This week on the podcast, we meet a tour guide leading camels through the wilderness, and a pinball manufacturer who wants to shake up his industry.

Plus, DJ Bettos Arcos plays some Christmas music from south of the border.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Games & Humor
5:00 pm
Sun December 22, 2013

In The World Of Pinball, An Underdog Takes On The Giant

Originally published on Sun December 22, 2013 6:53 pm

For more than a decade, Stern Pinball was the only manufacturer of pinball machines. The Chicago-based company's last rival closed down in 1999.

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Law
5:00 pm
Sun December 22, 2013

'New Level' Of Scandal With LA Sheriff's Department

Host Arun Rath talks with Los Angeles Times reporter Robert Faturechi about the troubles facing the L.A. County Sheriff's Department. More than a dozen current and former deputies face federal charges stemming from allegations of abuse and corruption.

All Tech Considered
2:58 pm
Sun December 22, 2013

Museums Give Video Games Bonus Life, But The Next Level Awaits

Flower, a 2009 release from thatgamecompany, is one of two video games the Smithsonian American Art Museum has acquired for its permanent collection.
Sony Entertainment/Smithsonian American Art Museum

Originally published on Fri December 27, 2013 9:36 am

The long-running debate over whether video games constitute art may finally be moot — at least as far as the Smithsonian American Art Museum is concerned. Last week, SAAM acquired two video games, Halo 2600 and Flower, for its permanent collection.

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Politics
11:55 am
Sun December 22, 2013

Pension Cut Angers Senate's Staunchest Military Supporters

Sen. Kelly Ayotte, R-N.H., left, is urging her Senate colleagues to change the budget proposal that cuts retirement benefits for current and future military retirees.
Susan Walsh AP

Originally published on Sun December 22, 2013 2:33 pm

In the two-year, $2 trillion budget deal that cleared the Senate last week, one item, worth just one-sixth of 1 percent of that total, was the reason many senators said they voted against it.

That item would produce some $6 billion in savings by shaving a percentage point off annual cost-of-living adjustments, and it would apply only to military pensions. Not all military pensions — just the retirement paid to veterans younger than 62.

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Opinion
9:47 am
Sun December 22, 2013

A Navy Man's Argument That Cutting Pensions Might Be Good

Originally published on Sun December 22, 2013 10:05 am

Bryan McGrath spent 21 years in the United States Navy before retiring. He now works as a defense contractor, and he believes that it's not necessarily a bad thing that military pensions are changing. NPR's Rachel Martin reports.

Around the Nation
9:47 am
Sun December 22, 2013

A Big Helping Of Christmas Compassion At Joseph's House

Originally published on Sun December 22, 2013 2:33 pm

Joseph's House is a hospice in Washington, D.C., for people who don't have a home. Started in 1990, it's a spot where people with end-stage AIDS and cancer can come to receive food, shelter, medication and community. NPR's Rachel Martin checks in for the holidays.

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