Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit



Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit



Young people loved President Obama in 2008 — they turned out to support him more than any other recent Democratic presidential nominee.

But now, there's a new crop of young voters — the kids who came of age during the Obama presidency. They're are all grown up, and getting their first chance to vote for president.

They grew up in a different era — after Sept. 11 attacks and in the middle of the recession.

The international aid group Doctors Without Borders (Médecins Sans Frontières) is calling for an international investigation into what it calls a war crime in Afghanistan — Saturday's U.S. airstrikes that killed 22 people, including medical staff and patients at the organization's hospital in Kunduz.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection has issued nationwide custody standards governing how immigrants are treated when in U.S. Border Patrol custody.

The Associated Press reports that the regulations cover scenarios including "guarding an immigrant's personal belongings, properly using handcuffs and other restraints and setting thermostats."

President Obama will meet with the families of those killed and injured when a man opened fire at a community college in Oregon.

Nine people were killed and nine others were wounded when Chris Harper Mercer, 26, began shooting in a classroom last Thursday.

After the shooting, Obama delivered his most impassioned speech to date regarding the need for stricter gun control laws.

With the stroke of a pen, California Gov. Jerry Brown made it legal for physicians in the state to prescribe lethal doses of medications if their terminally ill patients wish to end their lives.

Brown signed the "End of Life Act" into law on Monday, and in doing so California joins four other states — Oregon, Washington, Vermont and Montana — where patients' right to choose doctor-assisted death is protected either by law or court order.

Ellen Kullman, the CEO of the chemical company DuPont, said Monday that she will retire on Oct. 16. The announcement follows falling stock prices as the company struggles in the global economy.

Edward Breen, a DuPont board member, will serve as Kullman's interim replacement.

NPR's Chris Arnold reports on the leadership change.

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Updated at 9:15 p.m. ET.

California Gov. Jerry Brown signed landmark legislation Monday, allowing terminally ill patients to obtain lethal medication to end their lives when and where they choose.

In a deeply personal note, Brown said he read opposition materials carefully, but in the end was left to reflect on what he would want in the face of his own death.