National

Around the Nation
7:59 am
Sun March 9, 2014

Picking Apart Detroit To Make It Whole Again

Gabe Gloden and his wife Emily Goodson bought a table made out of the wood salvaged by Reclaim Detroit when they moved to the city a couple years ago.
Marvin Shaouni for NPR

Originally published on Sun March 9, 2014 12:00 pm

Images of a fallen city have drawn national attention to Detroit. But the focus now is on how to remake Detroit into the grand city it once was.

Part of the recovery process is repairing the bankrupt city's blight.

There are an estimated 80,000 abandoned buildings scattered throughout Detroit. In February, Kevyn Orr, the state-appointed emergency manager, announced a $500 million project to tear down those structures. Now all kinds of organizations are jockeying for position to win city contracts to do the work. One of those is Reclaim Detroit.

Read more
All Tech Considered
6:40 pm
Sat March 8, 2014

SXSW Diary: Aereo, The Supreme Court And TV's Future

Chet Kanojia is the founder and CEO of Aereo, which is fighting big broadcasters over its tiny antenna.
Elise Hu NPR

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 12:16 am

The crowds are so thick in Austin, Texas, that locals are using an Avoid Humans app to find some peace and quiet, and the warning at the convention center of South By Southwest Interactive goes something like this: "Only one person per escalator step OR YOU WILL BREAK IT!"

Read more
Around the Nation
5:34 pm
Sat March 8, 2014

Catching Kayla: Running One Step Ahead Of Multiple Sclerosis

Eighteen-year-old Kayla Montgomery from Mount Tabor High School in Winston-Salem, N.C., was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis three years ago.
Phil Ponder

Originally published on Sat March 8, 2014 8:23 pm

When the starting gun sounds at Mount Tabor High School track meets, senior Kayla Montgomery from Winston-Salem, N.C., takes off.

The 18-year-old runner sets records, wins state titles, and next week, she's headed to nationals in New York.

But when Montgomery runs, her legs go totally numb. She has multiple sclerosis, a disease that causes nerve damage and interference in communication between her brain, spinal cord and legs.

Read more
Religion
5:34 pm
Sat March 8, 2014

A Frat Of Their Own: Muslims Create A New Space On Campus

The brothers of Alpha Lambda Mu come from a variety of backgrounds and religious upbringings. "We meet at this middle ground we call brotherhood," says ALM founder Ali Mahmoud.
Dylan Hollingsworth

Originally published on Sat March 8, 2014 8:23 pm

Toga parties and keg stands have become stereotypes of college fraternities. But Ali Mahmoud had something else in mind when he founded Alpha Lambda Mu, the first social Muslim fraternity in the country.

"I realized that there was this void for Muslims on campus," says Mahmoud, a junior at the University of Texas at Dallas.

Read more
The Two-Way
5:11 pm
Sat March 8, 2014

Daylight Saving Time: Set Your Clocks Ahead Tonight

Custodian Ray Keen inspects a clock face before changing the time on a 100-year-old clock atop the Clay County Courthouse in Kansas Saturday. Americans will set their clocks forward one hour before heading to bed tonight; Daylight Saving Time officially starts Sunday at 2 a.m.
Charlie Riedel AP

Clocks will be set ahead by one hour tonight in much of America, as 2 a.m. will become 3 a.m. early Sunday, March 9. Among the states, only Hawaii and much of Arizona will keep their clocks set to Standard Time. Most of Europe won't begin what it calls "Summer Time" until March 30.

American territories that don't observe Daylight Saving Time include Puerto Rico, American Samoa, Guam and the U.S. Virgin Islands. The Navajo Indian Reservation in Arizona changes its clocks with the rest of the continental U.S.

Read more
The Two-Way
2:53 pm
Sat March 8, 2014

Weeks Later, Epic Spelling Bee Ends In Missouri

Kush Sharma of Kansas City, Mo., is headed to the Scripps National Spelling Bee, after winning a spell-off Saturday. After his win, he posed with students and teachers from his school, the Frontier School of Innovation.
Maria Carter KCUR

It took more than 90 rounds and a delay of two weeks, after judges ran out of words. But Jackson County, Mo., finally has its spelling bee champion, after two stellar spellers broke a tie Saturday.

Read more
Politics
11:31 am
Sat March 8, 2014

CPAC Is A Siren Call To GOP Presidential Hopefuls

At CPAC this year, even Sen. Rand Paul's cardboard cutout was drawing attention. The Kentucky lawmaker was leading in the straw poll among attendees Friday.
Jim Lo Scalzo EPA/Landov

Originally published on Sat March 8, 2014 2:00 pm

Start with a big ballroom at a resort hotel just outside D.C. Add thousands of conservative activists. Stir in hundreds of political journalists, and you've got an irresistible attraction for any Republican presidential hopeful.

For those with their eye on the Oval Office, it's also an early audition before a key audience.

It's the annual Conservative Political Action Conference — CPAC for short — where there's always talk of the next presidential election. This year as many as 10 possible 2016 candidates were invited to speak during the three-day event.

Read more
Economy
10:52 am
Sat March 8, 2014

What Germans Know Could Help Bridge U.S. Workers' Skill Gap

President Barack Obama promotes job training at General Electric's Waukesha, Wis., gas engine plant in January.
Jeffrey Phelps AP

Originally published on Sat March 8, 2014 11:31 am

Job training programs are failing to turn out enough skilled workers to fill job openings in the U.S., a phenomenon that puzzles some European companies that expand into the U.S.

President Obama freely admits that America needs to improve the way it trains workers. In a speech at a General Electric manufacturing plant in Wisconsin earlier this year, he said, "We gotta move away from what my labor secretary, Tom Perez, calls 'train and pray.' You train workers first and then you hope they get a job."

Read more
Music News
7:53 am
Sat March 8, 2014

Coming Up: Detroit Symphony Returns From The Brink

Originally published on Sat March 8, 2014 11:31 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Just a few years ago, Detroit Symphony Orchestra was in bad shape. An auditor predicted they'd be shuttered in months.

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: His famous line was we had no business being in business.

SIMON: Tomorrow on WEEKEND EDITION, how after a financial crisis, a bitter contract dispute, and a musicians' strike, the Detroit Symphony Orchestra still plays on. This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC) Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Politics
7:53 am
Sat March 8, 2014

Brothel Beckons To GOP: Hold Your Convention In Las Vegas

Originally published on Sat March 8, 2014 12:28 pm

Vegas is bidding to host the 2016 Republican National Convention. Besides plenty of hotel rooms, there's another perk to offer.

Pages