National

Shots - Health News
2:24 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

Map Of The Developing Human Brain Shows Where Problems Begin

Images of the developing fetal brain show connections among brain regions.
Allen Institute for Brain Science; Bruce Fischl, Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital

Originally published on Tue May 27, 2014 2:31 pm

A high-resolution map of the human brain in utero is providing hints about the origins of brain disorders including schizophrenia and autism.

The map shows where genes are turned on and off throughout the entire brain at about the midpoint of pregnancy, a time when critical structures are taking shape, researchers reported Wednesday in the journal Nature.

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All Tech Considered
2:00 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

While Warning Of Chinese Cyberthreat, U.S. Launches Its Own Attack

Staff members study networking at the training room of the Huawei Technologies Co. headquarters in Shenzhen, China, in June 2011.
Kin Cheung AP

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 2:54 pm

The U.S. government has long complained about Chinese hacking and cyberattacks, but new documents show that the National Security Agency managed to penetrate the networks of Huawei, a large Chinese telecommunications firm, gathering information about its operations and potentially using equipment it sells to other countries to monitor their computer and telephone networks as well.

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The Two-Way
1:14 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

GM Has 'Culture Of Cover-Up,' Key Senator Says

General Motors CEO Mary Barra as she testified Wednesday on Capitol Hill.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Day Two of General Motors CEO Mary Barra's time testifying before Congress about safety problems with her company's cars has been highlighted by a top senator saying the company "repeatedly lied" about its problems and has fostered a "culture of cover-up."

From The Detroit News:

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The Two-Way
1:14 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

A State Fossil For S. Carolina Faces Mammoth Obstacle

A fossil of a Columbian Mammoth in the Page Museum at the La Brea Tar Pits, Los Angeles.
Wikimedia Commons

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 5:27 pm

The Columbian mammoth is facing extinction as South Carolina's proposed state fossil unless the elephant-sized Ice Age mammal can survive the efforts of creationist lawmakers.

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The Salt
1:08 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

The Old And Mysterious Practice Of Eating Dirt, Revealed

Dr. William Rawlings holds a piece of kaolin from his hometown of Sandersville, Ga.
Courtesy of Adam Forrester

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 9:51 am

There's an old saying in the South: "A child's gotta eat their share of dirt."

Mamie Lee Hillman's family took this literally, but they weren't after just any old dirt.

"I remember my mom and my aunties eating that white dirt like it was nothing," says Hillman, who grew up in Greene County, Ga., and used to go with her family to dig for their own dirt to snack on. "It was an acceptable thing that people did."

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The Two-Way
11:04 am
Wed April 2, 2014

Drones Will Not Be Hunted In Colorado Town

It's going to remain safe for drones in the skies above Deer Trail, Colo.
U.S. Customs and Border Protection AP

You won't be able to fire away at government drones — if any were to fly by — in Deer Trail, Colo.

A proposal to issue $25 drone hunting licenses was rejected Tuesday by voters in the little town about 55 miles east of Denver.

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The Two-Way
10:59 am
Wed April 2, 2014

Supreme Court Strikes Down Overall Limits On Political Contributions

People wait in line for the beginning of the 2013-2014 Supreme Court term in Washington on Oct. 7. The court heard the first major case on campaign contribution limits since 2010's landmark Citizens United.
Evan Vucci AP

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 12:34 pm

The U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday struck down an overall cap on the amount that large campaign donors can give to parties and candidates in a two-year election cycle.

In a 5-4 decision split between conservatives and liberals on the high court, the court said the limits were a violation of the First Amendment.

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The Two-Way
8:56 am
Wed April 2, 2014

Job Growth Picked Up Some Speed In March, Survey Signals

Kiara Crawford, Brittney Winkler and Jessyca Freeman (left to right) were among those applying for work last month at a job fair in Washington, D.C. Early data from that month signal that job growth may have gained some speed.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

The first slice of data about job growth in March offers some hope that the U.S. labor market gained some strength:

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The Two-Way
8:23 am
Wed April 2, 2014

Oso Mudslide: As List Of Missing Shrinks, Death Toll Rises

A flag flies at half-staff in the midst of the mudslide rubble in Oso, Wash.
U.S. Army National Guard/handout Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 2:45 pm

This post will be updated as news comes in.

Here is some of the latest news from Oso, Wash., the tiny community north of Seattle that was devastated by a mudslide on March 22:

-- Death Toll At 29: Authorities say the number of confirmed fatalities as of this morning was 29. (We updated that figure at 11:15 a.m. ET.)

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Around the Nation
6:16 am
Wed April 2, 2014

Finding A More Nuanced View Of Poverty's 'Black Hole'

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 1:04 pm

Ask Anne Valdez what poverty means for her, and her answer will describe much more than a simple lack of money.

"It's like being stuck in a black hole," says Valdez, 47, who is unemployed and trying to raise a teenage son in Coney Island, New York City. "Poverty is like literally being held back from enjoying life, almost to the point of not being able to breathe."

For years, researchers have complained that the way the government measures income and poverty is severely flawed, that it provides an incomplete — and even distorted — view.

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