National

The Two-Way
1:00 pm
Sun April 6, 2014

Women's Final Four: Powerhouse Teams Match Up

Connecticut players stretch during practice on the court hosting the women's Final Four in Nashville. The games tip off today with a 6:30 p.m. ET start time.
John Bazemore AP

Two undefeated teams are still alive in the women's NCAA basketball tournament – and they could meet in a record-setting final Tuesday, if Connecticut and Notre Dame can get past Stanford and Maryland, respectively, on Sunday. The four programs have all won national championships in the past.

The teams will play in Nashville's Bridgestone Arena. Here are Sunday's tip-off times on ESPN and WatchESPN online, all times Eastern:

  • Maryland vs. Notre Dame: 6:30 p.m.
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Sports
11:22 am
Sun April 6, 2014

It's Kentucky Vs. UConn For NCAA Championship

Originally published on Sun April 6, 2014 1:49 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Sports
11:22 am
Sun April 6, 2014

UConn To Face Kentucky In NCAA Final

Originally published on Sun April 6, 2014 1:49 pm

The matchup is set for Monday's men's NCAA basketball championship. The Connecticut Huskies will take on the Kentucky Wildcats.

The Two-Way
11:18 am
Sun April 6, 2014

Atlanta Archbishop Will Sell Mansion Built With Church Money

This new $2.2 million mansion brought a backlash against Atlanta Archbishop Wilton Gregory, who says he will move out of the house in the city's upscale Buckhead neighborhood.
David Goldman AP

Originally published on Mon April 7, 2014 9:29 am

The archbishop of Atlanta is apologizing for building a multimillion-dollar home with money earmarked for charitable use. Anger erupted over Archbishop Wilton Gregory's $2.2 million mansion last month. The Tudor-style mansion is in Buckhead, one of the city's priciest neighborhoods.

From Atlanta, member station WABE's Jim Burress reports:

"Atlanta's Archbishop says he was wrong to spend so much money.

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Race
10:44 am
Sun April 6, 2014

#CancelColbert Let Asian-Americans Call Out The Real Ding-Dongs

Stephen Colbert responded to criticism about a tweet about his show from his TV network last Monday, saying he would dismantle the imaginary foundation that created the stir.
Comedy Central

Originally published on Sun April 6, 2014 2:20 pm

It surely says something about our culture that a single tweet can turn into a major racial incident.

You've likely heard the flap over comedian Stephen Colbert's send-up of Washington Redskins owner Dan Snyder's new foundation to help Native Americans.

The controversy erupted when a Twitter account associated with Colbert's show, The Colbert Report, took the joke too far — away from its original context.

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NPR Story
10:44 am
Sun April 6, 2014

Fort Hood Shooting Reopened Wounds At Trauma Unit

Originally published on Sun April 6, 2014 1:49 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. U.S. Army officials are saying that an argument may have set off Specialist Ivan Lopez, who went on a shooting rampage at Fort Hood this past week. He killed four people, including himself, and injured 16 others. Those who survived were taken to Baylor Scott and White Hospital nearby in Temple, Texas. Dr. Matthew Davis is the head of the trauma program there. He and his staff also treated the injured after the 2009 mass shooting at Fort Hood.

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Remembrances
10:34 am
Sun April 6, 2014

Peter Matthiessen, Co-Founder Of The Paris Review, Dies At 86

Peter Matthiessen, shown here at his New York house in 2004, was a Zen Buddhist priest, a spy, an activist and a well-respected writer of both fiction and nonfiction.
Ed Betz AP

Originally published on Mon April 7, 2014 1:34 pm

Author Peter Matthiessen has died in New York at the age of 86 from acute myeloid leukemia. Matthiessen, a novelist and naturalist, wrote 33 books; among his best-known works are The Snow Leopard and the novels Far Tortuga and At Play in the Fields of the Lord, which was made into a Hollywood film.

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The Two-Way
10:31 am
Sun April 6, 2014

Mudslide Tragedy: Donations Outpace Capacity In Oso

Gabriella Botamanenko (center left) hugs her mother, Angela Botamanenko, during a vigil for mudslide victims at the Darrington Community Center Saturday. A March 22 mudslide in a nearby community killed at least 30 and left many missing.
David Ryder Getty Images

Originally published on Sun April 6, 2014 11:46 am

It's been two weeks since the massive mudslide came down on a tiny mountain community in Washington state. The disaster killed 30 people; 13 are still missing. The tragedy prompted an outpouring of donations — and officials in Oso say they don't have room for more items.

Federal disaster relief officials are visiting the site Sunday, as member station KUOW's Sara Lerner reports for our Newscast unit:

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The Two-Way
9:53 am
Sun April 6, 2014

Search For Flight MH370: Ship Detects Pulse Signal Again

Angus Houston, head of the Joint Agency Coordination Center leading the search for missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370, says ships are being sent to investigate reports of a signal being detected on a frequency used by black box equipment.
Tony Ashby AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun April 6, 2014 2:42 pm

Ships and search planes are being sent to investigate a pulse signal that a Chinese patrol ship outfitted with a black-box detector picked up twice this weekend, says Australia's Angus Houston, who is leading the international search effort for the missing Malaysia Airlines jet. But he adds that it's too early to say whether the signal is a breakthrough in the search.

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The Two-Way
8:26 am
Sun April 6, 2014

Peter Matthiessen Dies At 86; Wrote Of Travels In The Natural World

Writer Peter Matthiessen died Saturday at age 86 after a long fight with leukemia, according to his publisher. Here, he stands in the yard of his house in Sagaponack, N.Y., in 2004.
Ed Betz AP

Originally published on Sun April 6, 2014 11:31 am

Author Peter Matthiessen, who used fiction and nonfiction to explore how man relates to nature, has died at 86. The revered naturalist and novelist had been suffering from leukemia; he died Saturday afternoon, his publisher confirmed.

In a career that began in the 1950s, Matthiessen connected readers to people and places that were being irrevocably changed by the modern world. And in the process, he often gave them a window into the changes that shaped his own life, as well.

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