National

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From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

For generations, owning a home has been a key part of the lifestyle most Americans aspire to. But when the mortgage crisis exploded in 2007, it brought down the U.S. housing market — and the entire economy along with it.

The ensuing recession was an assault on the American dream of homeownership itself. The tidal wave of foreclosures, the crash in home prices and tighter lending standards have left some Americans unable or simply too nervous to buy a house.

Last week, The New York Times reported that Stuxnet, the computer worm that infected computers around the world in 2010, was developed by the United States in conjunction with Israel to destroy Iran's nuclear centrifuges.

"It appears to be the first time the United States has repeatedly used cyberweapons to cripple another country's infrastructure, achieving, with computer code, what until then could be accomplished only by bombing a country or sending in agents to plant explosives," wrote David Sanger, the paper's chief Washington correspondent.

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'Bachelor' Lawsuit Charges Racism

Jun 4, 2012

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Gay GOP Candidate Reveals Closeted History

Jun 4, 2012

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This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin.

Coming up, George Zimmerman is back behind bars. We'll find out why. NPR's Greg Allen is with us for the latest in the case against the man who killed Trayvon Martin.

It's hard to go a day without hearing people brag about how they eat local. In-the-know consumers wax poetic about their local farmers' markets, and some even make pilgrimages to meet their rancher, visit cows grazing and see pigs playing happily in the mud.

Big Money: Stuffing The Ballot Box?

Jun 4, 2012

You wouldn't think politicians would have any trouble raising enough money these days. The presidential race is expected to be a billion-dollar affair, and spending records have been shattered at the congressional level.

As ordered by a judge on Friday, neighborhood watch volunteer George Zimmerman has turned himself into authorities and is back in a Sanford, Fla., jail.

Now, as the Orlando Sentinel reports, Zimmerman's attorney is preparing a request that he again be released on bond.

Lots at stake tomorrow, June 5, with primaries in five states, in addition to what would be only the third recall of a sitting governor in U.S. history. Here's the lineup:

Sunday marks 50 years since what was then the world's deadliest airplane accident: a crash that claimed 130 lives outside Paris. The most devastated community was not in France, but in the United States.

It was the worst thing that ever happened to Milton Bevington. He witnessed the crash of the Boeing 707 at Orly Airport, with his wife and mother-in-law onboard.

"The plane went up about 6 feet and came back down and bounced around, zigzagged and finally broke in half," he said.

Wanna Make A Bet On Horse Racing?

Jun 3, 2012

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If life is a ball game, then Mike Pesca is WEEKEND EDITION's own personal bookie, taking our bets and luckily giving some advice under his breath. He is of course NPR's sports correspondent and he joins us now as he does each week.

On Saturday night, the NBA semifinals notched yet another thriller as the Oklahoma City Thunder resisted a late push by the San Antonio Spurs. The series is now even at 2-2.

Thunder star Kevin Durant's fourth-quarter heroics were a spectacle — but just as mesmerizing was the man patrolling the sidelines in a pearly white jacket, blue shirt and fire-truck red pants.

That would be Craig Sager, TNT's go-to sideline reporter for NBA games. His outlandish outfits have made him an iconic part of the NBA on TV.

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The Economy From The People's Perspective

Jun 3, 2012

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This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin.

We Got The Jobs Report, Now What?

Jun 3, 2012

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And after Friday's unexpectedly weak jobs report, the financial markets are gearing up for more volatility.

NPR's Jim Zarroli looks at the latest slowdown and what might be done to get the economy moving.

The Obama-Clinton Dynamic

Jun 3, 2012

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How Homes Structure The American Dream

Jun 3, 2012

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All summer long, NPR is exploring the American Dream, what it means to people and why it matters. Homeownership has always been a cornerstone of that dream, whether it's a covered wagon and plot of land, or a picket fence on a cul-de-sac.

Blacksmiths Forge A New, Artisanal Future

Jun 3, 2012

Adam's Forge is a dark, high-ceilinged warehouse space in Los Angeles. It's set up with anvils, medieval-looking tools and black ovens that breathe fire.

Recently, about a dozen people gathered for an advanced class taught by master blacksmith Mark Aspery.

Blacksmithing is an ancient trade that, like other crafts, saw a downturn during the Industrial Revolution, when machines took over jobs that humans once did. Now, blacksmithing is having a small revival as smiths build new ways of connecting with customers.

'This Is My Craft'

Congress May Not Be As Bad As All That

Jun 3, 2012

Washington isn't working. With control of the government divided between the parties and every political incentive working against bipartisan cooperation, Congress can barely pass the minimum amount of legislation needed to avoid a government shutdown, let alone address the most pressing issues of the day.

Nuns Fight Back Against Vatican Report

Jun 2, 2012

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Time now for sports!

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Implications Of The Facebook Let-Down

Jun 2, 2012

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So, why is job growth slowing? Well, part of the problem, as we just heard, appears to be in Europe. The economic turmoil there is looking worse, and that has ripped into the U.S. economy and slowing down hiring. NPR's Chris Arnold has more from Boston.

Across the Mississippi River from St. Louis' famous Gateway Arch is a part of Illinois that's a post-industrial wasteland.

Some hope the construction of a new bridge across the Mississippi River will help revitalize the area. But archaeologists worry future development could destroy what's left of another neighborhood — one that flourished there almost a thousand years ago.

New information about computer viruses shows how countries may be lining up to fight a cyberwar. The New York Times reported that former President George W. Bush and President Obama both authorized computer attacks against Iran, culminating in the Stuxnet virus, which targeted Iranian nuclear facilities.

Meanwhile, a United Nations agency raised alarms about another virus, dubbed "Flame," which may also have been designed for use against Iran.

If unusually warm weather helped encourage job growth earlier this year, May was like a wet, cold rain. A report from the Labor Department on Friday showed that U.S. employers added just 69,000 jobs last month — far fewer than expected.

Among the biggest advertisers in the presidential campaign is a group that says it doesn't do political advertising: Crossroads GPS.

Crossroads GPS — which stands for Grassroots Policy Strategies — was co-founded by Republican strategist Karl Rove. It and others like it enable wealthy donors to finance attack ads while avoiding the public identification they would face if they gave to more overtly political committees.

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From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

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