National

National Security
5:08 am
Tue June 12, 2012

Does Leaking Secrets Damage National Security?

James Clapper, director of national intelligence, leaves a closed-door joint meeting with the Senate and House Intelligence committees on June 7. Clapper ordered an inquiry into security leaks to be concluded next week.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 12, 2012 8:18 am

Last week's assignment of two federal prosecutors to investigate disclosures of national security information might have been the first shot in a new war on leaks. The director of national intelligence is expected soon to announce new measures to fight unauthorized disclosures, and some members of Congress say it could be time for new anti-leaking laws.

Read more
U.S.
5:03 am
Tue June 12, 2012

Loud Debate Rages Over N.Y. Library's Quiet Stacks

The New York Public Library's Rose Reading Room sits atop seven floors of book stacks, all closed to the public. Under a controversial renovation plan, many of those books would be moved to New Jersey.
Bebeto Matthews AP

Originally published on Tue June 12, 2012 8:18 am

Enter the glorious Rose Reading Room on the third floor of the New York Public Library on a weekday afternoon, and you'll find almost every chair filled.

Scholars and researchers still submit their book requests on slips of paper and wait for their numbers to appear on two large boards.

The stacks, filled with some 3 million volumes, are closed to the public, so books are retrieved from seven floors of shelving below. Still other volumes are stored off-site.

Read more
National Security
2:58 am
Tue June 12, 2012

As Drone Strikes Grow, So Do Concerns Over Use

An unmanned U.S. Predator drone flies over Kandahar Air Field in southern Afghanistan on Jan. 31, 2010. Drones have become the U.S. weapon of choice in the fight against terrorism. But as the technology of this new form of warfare improves, so do concerns about how others will use it in the future.
Kirsty Wigglesworth AP

Originally published on Tue June 12, 2012 10:28 am

Without question, drones have become the U.S. weapon of choice in the fight against terrorism. Counterterrorism officials say they've come to rely on the pilotless aircraft for their surveillance capability and what officials say is precision targeting. That reliance has led to greater use in the past couple of years, especially in Pakistan and Yemen.

John Bellinger, a State Department legal adviser during the George W. Bush administration, says there are increasing concerns about the frequency of drone attacks.

Read more
U.S.
5:43 pm
Mon June 11, 2012

Program Teaches Vets How To Survive The Classroom

Jay Blake (left), who served in the Marines, rides the elevator with his fellow students at Sierra Community College in Rocklin, Calif.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Mon June 11, 2012 10:55 pm

Most American troops have left Iraq, and many have left Afghanistan. Now more than half a million of them have left the service — and they're going to college. Some vets say the transition is like landing on another planet, but they aren't the only ones struggling: The college staffs are, too.

Read more
London 2012: The Summer Olympics
5:27 pm
Mon June 11, 2012

A Newbie Tries To Squeeze Into The U.S. Olympic Pool

Superstar swimmers Michael Phelps (left) and Ryan Lochte are versatile and talented, making spots on the U.S. men's Olympic team scarce. The pair took silver and gold, respectively, in the 200-meter individual medley at last summer's World Championships.
Peter Parks AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon June 11, 2012 8:10 pm

Across the country, swimmers are putting in their final laps before this month's Olympic trials. For many, the dream of making the U.S. swim team has been what gets them out of bed for a predawn practice. But on the men's side of the pool, the superstars of swimming often leave little room for anyone else.

At a recent swim practice in Nashville, Tenn., Dakota Hodgson, 20, puts in laps. And speed-walking to keep up, stopwatch in hand, is his gray-haired coach and father, Charlie Hodgson.

Charlie calls out Dakota's time: "29.24."

Read more
Election 2012
5:25 pm
Mon June 11, 2012

Arizona Voters Choosing Gabby Giffords' Replacement

Democrat Ron Barber (left) and Republican Jesse Kelly during a May 23 debate in Tucson. They are running Tuesday in a special election to replace retired Rep. Gabrielle Giffords.
Kelly Presnell Arizona Daily Star

Originally published on Mon June 11, 2012 8:10 pm

Voters in southeastern Arizona go to the polls Tuesday in a special election to fill the rest of the congressional term of former Rep. Gabrielle Giffords.

Giffords, a Democrat, resigned in January, a year after she was critically wounded in a shooting rampage. Running to fill the remaining six months of her term are her former aide, Ron Barber, and Republican Jesse Kelly, a businessman and Iraq War veteran.

The special election has echoes of the 2010 congressional campaign in the Tucson-based 8th Congressional District.

Read more
Law
4:52 pm
Mon June 11, 2012

Commerce Secretary's Crashes Raise Questions

Originally published on Mon June 11, 2012 8:10 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

A member of the Cabinet is under investigation for a series of auto accidents in California. Commerce Secretary John Bryson allegedly hit a car that was stopped at a railroad crossing on Saturday, then hit it again as he drove off. Later, Bryson allegedly hit a second vehicle. He was found unconscious in his car. Police say there's no indication that drugs or alcohol played a role and no one was seriously hurt. The Commerce Department says Bryson suffered a seizure, as NPR's Scott Horsley reports.

Read more
Law
4:51 pm
Mon June 11, 2012

Security Leak Investigation Expected To Be Slippery

Originally published on Mon June 11, 2012 8:10 pm

Late last week the attorney general, under pressure from lawmakers, appointed two prosecutors to look into leaks of national security secrets. But leak cases are notoriously difficult to prosecute, and the prospects for these cases are problematic.

Law
4:49 pm
Mon June 11, 2012

Fewer English Speakers Cause Crunch In Nev. Courts

Originally published on Wed June 13, 2012 9:50 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

The number of Nevada residents who are not fluent in English jumped almost 50 percent over the last decade. And that increase has led to a growing demand for interpreter services in Nevada's courts.

As Jude Joffe-Block of member station KJZZ reports, courts are having a tough time meeting that demand because of shrinking budgets.

Read more
Law
4:46 pm
Mon June 11, 2012

Opening Statements Paint Two Pictures Of Sandusky

Originally published on Mon June 11, 2012 8:10 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

I'm Melissa Block. And this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News.

CORNISH: The child sex abuse trial of Jerry Sandusky began today in Pennsylvania. The former Penn State assistant football coach faces more than 50 counts of sexually abusing 10 young boys. He denies the charges. Lawyers painted two sharply conflicted portraits of Sandusky in opening statements today.

NPR's Joel Rose was in the courtroom in Bellefonte, Pennsylvania and joins me now. Hello, Joel.

Read more

Pages