National

London 2012: The Summer Olympics
5:21 am
Wed June 13, 2012

Fencing's Father-Son Duo Hones An Olympic Dream

Alexander Massialas (left) lands a touch on Britain's Keith Cook during last year's Fencing International Invitation in London.
Sang Tan AP

Originally published on Wed June 13, 2012 8:17 pm

When they travel to London to compete in this summer's Olympics, many elite athletes will be joined by family members. But for Alexander Massialas and his father, Greg, it's different. Both of them will represent the United States — one as a coach, and the other as an athlete.

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Energy
5:12 am
Wed June 13, 2012

Ruling Could Help Break The Nuclear-Waste Logjam

About 70,000 tons of used nuclear fuel sits mostly at power plants across the country. Much is kept underwater in spent fuel pools, but utility companies have been moving the fuel into concrete and steel casks like these in Richland, Wash. Energy Northwest CEO Vic Parrish (center) tours the facility with Reps. Doc Hastings (left) and Jay Inslee.
Shannon Dininny AP

Originally published on Wed June 13, 2012 12:43 pm

The federal government promised almost 30 years ago to find a place to bury nuclear waste from power plants. It hasn't. So the waste is piling up at power plants around the country.

Now a federal court says the government must prove that this temporary solution is truly safe. The decision could help break the nuclear-waste logjam.

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The Salt
4:29 am
Wed June 13, 2012

Farmers Split Over Subsidies As Senate Farm Bill Debate Begins

Larry Sailer on his corn and soybean farm, just north of Iowa Falls, Iowa.
Jonathan Ahl for NPR

Originally published on Wed June 13, 2012 8:48 am

The latest proposal for the farm bill — the law governing everything from food stamps to rural development grants — is being considered by the U.S. Senate this week. It's designed to save more than $23 billion over the next 10 years, in part by getting rid of direct payments to farmers. The direct payment program alone costs taxpayers $5 billion per year.

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Politics
4:29 am
Wed June 13, 2012

Why The Farm Bill's Provisions Will Matter To You

Dairy cows feed on a farm in Chilton, Wis., in May. The farm bill being considered by Congress, part of a massive package that could cost nearly $1 trillion over a decade, contains a number of provisions affecting dairies.
Carrie Antlfinger AP

Originally published on Wed June 13, 2012 12:49 pm

If you think only farmers care about the farm bill currently being considered by Congress, you're very, very mistaken.

The measure will not only set policy and spending for the nation's farms for years to come, but it will also affect dozens of other seemingly unrelated programs — all at a cost of nearly $1 trillion over the next decade. Following are a few questions and answers about the massive legislation:

Why is it called the farm bill, and where did it come from?

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Politics
5:55 pm
Tue June 12, 2012

Where Are The Democratic Billionaires?

Democrats knew that they would be disadvantaged under the new campaign finance rules created by the Supreme Court. But the disparity between the amount of money Republicans can raise in unlimited anonymous donations and what the Democrats have been able to raise is huge.

Around the Nation
5:37 pm
Tue June 12, 2012

The Salton Sea Fades Away, And A Town With It

The barren earth and dead trees reveal the blight of the Salton Sea, where water conservation efforts are attempting to restore the once natural playground and tourist site in California.
Lenny Ignelzi AP

Originally published on Tue June 12, 2012 9:03 pm

In the middle of California's driest desert is the Salton Sea, the state's largest lake. Once a popular tourist destination, the storied salty and toxic lake nestled in the Imperial Valley has been slowly shrinking over the years.

A water transfer deal passed in 2003 could speed up that process, and some are now worried it could be an environmental and health disaster for the region.

Standing near the Salton Sea's receding shoreline on a recent day, 75-year-old Ed Angel points to a ragged patch of desert with dying palm trees.

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Law
5:37 pm
Tue June 12, 2012

Clemens' Jury Deliberates After Weeks Of Testimony

Former pitcher Roger Clemens leaves a federal court in Washington, D.C., on Tuesday. His fate is in the hands of a jury that will decide whether the former pitcher lied about his use of performance-enhancing drugs.
Manuel Balce Ceneta AP

Originally published on Tue June 12, 2012 8:02 pm

The Roger Clemens perjury case is in the hands of the jury now. The panel of eight women and four men began deliberations late Tuesday, after prosecution and defense lawyers made their final arguments.

While the star pitcher's defense called the case "outrageous," prosecutors charged that Clemens chose to lie, mislead and impede a congressional investigation when he testified about performance-enhancing drugs.

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Law
5:28 pm
Tue June 12, 2012

Attorney General Grilled On Security Leaks

Originally published on Tue June 12, 2012 8:02 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish. Attorney General Eric Holder was called to testify on Capitol Hill today where Republicans on the Senate Judiciary Committee skewered Holder. They challenged his ability to oversee a rigorous investigation of national security leaks. They demanded more information about the botched gun operation known as Fast and Furious, and they even called for Holder's resignation. NPR's Carrie Johnson reports.

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The Salt
3:52 pm
Tue June 12, 2012

Will Beer And Brats Break Through Wisconsin's Partisan Divide?

Democrats may not bite at the brats and beer Gov. Walker is offering.
SaucyGlo Flickr.com

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker beat back Democrats' efforts to kick him out of office last week in an election widely seen as a national referendum on labor policies.

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The Impact of War
3:45 pm
Tue June 12, 2012

To Rehabilitate Young Vets, Go Hunting

Jake Dobberke, 26, a Marine who lost his legs in Afghanistan, watches for turkeys in Potter County, Pa. The LEEK Hunting and Mountain Preserve helps healing young vets explore the wilderness in adaptive hunting gear.
Jenelle Pifer WESA

Originally published on Tue June 12, 2012 8:02 pm

Recreational rehabilitation programs have long been a favorite for helping disabled veterans acclimate after war, and the number of young and disabled vets returning who need those services is on the rise.

Two brothers — with nearly 60 years of military service between them — are trying to help with a unique retreat that's free for young vets. The program gets them out of their hospital beds for a few days to hunt in rural Pennsylvania.

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