National

Education
1:31 pm
Fri September 28, 2012

New Wave Of School Integration In Birmingham, Ala.

First-grade teacher Euginia Miller reads to her class at Avondale Elementary School in Birmingham, Ala. In this crucible of the civil rights movement, the city's schools are being reintegrated, as a handful of middle-class parents ignore the school district's poor reputation and enroll their kids in the city's public schools.
Dan Carsen WBHM

Originally published on Sat September 29, 2012 7:05 pm

When Laura Kate Whitney enrolled her 4-year-old, Grey, at Avondale Elementary, a public school in Birmingham, Ala., she and her husband were bucking a trend. Whitney and her husband are white, middle-class professionals. Public schools in Birmingham are 95 percent black, and 90 percent of the students are on free or reduced lunch.

Whitney's is one of about two-dozen similar families who are not buying into the conventional tradeoff that if you live within city limits and have means, you send your kids to private schools.

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'It's All Politics': NPR's Weekly News Roundup
12:03 pm
Fri September 28, 2012

It's All Politics, Sept. 27, 2012

Tony Dejak AP

Less than six weeks to go and President Obama seems to have opened up a lead in the battleground states of Ohio, Virginia and Florida. Aside from poor economic numbers and worsening international events, Mitt Romney's best hope lies in the debates, which begin next week. Also to no one's surprise β€” and Sen. Claire McCaskill's delight β€” Todd Akin stays in the Missouri Senate race.

Join NPR's Ron Elving and Ken Rudin for the latest political news in this week's roundup.

The Two-Way
12:03 pm
Fri September 28, 2012

No Evidence Yet Of Jimmy Hoffa Under That Michigan Driveway

In Roseville, Mich., officials carry away a soil sample taken from under a driveway where a tipster says a body was buried decades ago β€” raising speculation that it might be Jimmy Hoffa.
Bill Pugliano Getty Images

So far, at least, the dirt beneath a driveway in Roseville, Mich., isn't turning up any sign that former Teamsters boss Jimmy Hoffa was buried there 37 years ago.

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The Two-Way
11:43 am
Fri September 28, 2012

Due To Threat, University Barred Colorado Shootings Suspect, Prosecutors Say

James Holmes in a Sept. 20 sheriff's photo.
Arapahoe County Sheriff's Office Getty Images

Originally published on Fri September 28, 2012 1:08 pm

The man charged with killing 12 people and wounding 58 others at an Aurora, Colo., movie theater on July 20 threatened a University of Colorado psychiatrist about six weeks before the massacre and was barred from campus "as a result of those actions," according to local prosecutors.

They also say in court documents released this morning that James Holmes' alleged threat was reported to university police at the time.

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Middle East
11:33 am
Fri September 28, 2012

Should The World Brace For An Iran-Israel War?

Originally published on Thu October 4, 2012 11:50 am

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee. Michel Martin is away. Coming up, violence erupted at the University of Mississippi 50 years ago when an African-American student tried to enroll. We'll look back on that day in just a few minutes.

But, first, to the United Nations. Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said yesterday, the only way to prevent Iran from attaining a nuclear bomb is to draw a clear red line.

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The Salt
10:08 am
Fri September 28, 2012

Some Grumble About Change As School Lunches Get Leaner And Greener

Michelle Kloser, School Nutrition Director for the West Salem School District in Wisconsin took this picture of Thursday's lunch, which includes baked chicken and rosemary potatoes.
Michelle Kloser for NPR

Originally published on Tue October 2, 2012 1:16 pm

This fall, the more than 38 million kids who get their lunches through the National School Lunch Program are seeing big changes on their trays.

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The Two-Way
7:14 am
Fri September 28, 2012

'It's Insane. It's Crazy:' Gunman Kills Four, Then Himself, In Minneapolis

In shock: The scene outside a Minneapolis business Thursday. A gunman killed four people, wounded four others and then killed himself.
Richard Tsong-Taatarii Minneapolis Star Tribune/MCT /Landov

Originally published on Fri September 28, 2012 9:03 am

"This is something we see on the news in other parts of the country, not here," Minneapolis Deputy Police Chief Kris Arneson said Thursday night as her department began investigating why a man apparently walked into a sign company, killed at least four people and then took his own life.

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StoryCorps
3:28 am
Fri September 28, 2012

Finding Health After Letting Go Of Hate

Charlie Morris, 91, says he was at school in 1939 when he found out his brother was dead. For 10 years, his hatred consumed him and plagued his body with mysterious ailments. "When I began to forgive, there was all the answers to my illness," he says.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri September 28, 2012 12:49 pm

In 1939, Jessie Lee Bond died. His death certificate says he drowned accidentally, but his family has always maintained that he was lynched after an argument with white shop owners β€” shot and thrown into the river.

No one has ever been charged with his death.

Decades later, his now-91-year-old brother, Charlie Morris, told StoryCorps in Memphis, Tenn., that he was at school when he was called down to the office and told that his brother had been murdered.

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Education
3:24 am
Fri September 28, 2012

Parsing Fact From Fiction In 'Won't Back Down'

Nona Alberts (Viola Davis) and Jamie Fitzpatrick (Maggie Gyllenhaal) share a triumphant moment with Nona's son Cody (Dante Brown) and Jamie's daughter Malia (Emily Alyn Lind).
Kerry Hayes 20th Century Fox

Originally published on Fri September 28, 2012 10:19 am

Won't Back Down opens with a little girl's anguished face. It fills the entire screen. The camera hovers as she struggles to read a simple sentence on the blackboard out loud.

She's dyslexic. Not that anyone at Adams Elementary cares β€” least of all her second-grade teacher, who is berating or slapping kids around when she's not shopping for shoes online.

But if it was your kid who was struggling and nobody at school cared, what would you do? What could you do? That's how director Daniel Barnz hooks you.

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Economy
3:24 am
Fri September 28, 2012

Easy Money May Boost Economy But At What Cost?

Specialist David Pologruto works at his post on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange on Sept. 13, as Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke holds a news conference in Washington. The world's central banks are easing credit, putting more money into the global economy.
Richard Drew AP

Originally published on Fri September 28, 2012 12:31 pm

The world's central banks are pumping cash into their economies, pushing down interest rates in hopes the ready cash and lower rates will boost borrowing and economic activity. Everyone agrees the action is dramatic and unprecedented, but there's disagreement over whether they will do more harm than good.

Economists know very well the trillions of dollars being added by the central banks to the global economy can be risky.

"These are risks about long-term rises in inflation, housing bubbles potentially building up," says Jacob Kirkegaard of the Peterson Institute.

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