National

It's All Politics
4:20 pm
Fri November 2, 2012

What If There's No Winner? Presidential Campaigns And Their Lawyers Prepare

People cast their ballots at an early-voting center in Columbus, Ohio, on Oct. 15.
Jewel Samad AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri November 2, 2012 5:46 pm

The presidential race is expected to be extremely close, and that has a lot of people nervous about what it will mean for election night.

Does it mean that the vote count could drag on for days, or even weeks, as it did in 2000?

Lawyers for the campaigns, the political parties and state election offices are preparing for the possibility.

Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted could very well be the man in the middle of any election night storm. By all accounts, the vote in his crucial battleground state will be extremely close.

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Economy
3:40 pm
Fri November 2, 2012

Sandy, Election Could Skew Future Jobs Reports

Workers clean up debris left by Superstorm Sandy in Long Beach Island, N.J., on Wednesday. The storm may lead to layoffs as business losses mount, but also could result in hiring related to rebuilding.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Originally published on Fri November 2, 2012 7:20 pm

Each month, the Labor Department issues an employment report. On Friday, that report showed job creation rose in October — and it revealed something more.

With its latest unemployment assessment, the government in effect took a BEFORE snapshot of the U.S. economy. It collected all of the data before Superstorm Sandy slammed into the East Coast and before the election outcome could be known. Each of those two events has the potential to change the AFTER outlook.

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The Two-Way
1:48 pm
Fri November 2, 2012

As Tempers Flare At Stations, Moves Are Made To Get Gas To N.Y, N.J.

Rather than sit in their cars, many people on Staten Island today lined up at stations with gas cans — hoping to get a few gallons before supplies ran out.
Mike Segar Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Fri November 2, 2012 11:48 pm

Across the region around New York City and northern New Jersey today, "motorists increasingly desperate for a fill-up fumed in long lines at gas stations and screamed at each other" as post-Sandy shortages continued, The Associated Press reports.

Relief, hopefully, is coming soon.

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Shots - Health News
12:33 pm
Fri November 2, 2012

Attention, Shoppers: Health Care Prices Go Online In Colorado

If that ski run goes bad in Colorado, at least you'll be able to find the best price for a scan of your knee.
iStockphoto.com

If you need an MRI of your knee in Colorado, the price varies — a lot.

You can pay anywhere from $350 to $2,336. It's a huge range, but the truly remarkable thing about the prices is that we know them at all.

Prices for health care aren't public in most places, making shopping for the best deal nearly impossible. And patients pay different amounts for the same procedure based on their insurance coverage, too.

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NPR Story
12:27 pm
Fri November 2, 2012

How Secure are Electronic Voting Machines?

Originally published on Fri November 2, 2012 1:40 pm

Election Day 2012 is just around the corner, and many Americans will be casting their ballots on electronic voting machines. But how reliable are these devices? Michael Alvarez, professor of political science at Caltech, discusses the technologies at your polling station.

'It's All Politics': NPR's Weekly News Roundup
12:27 pm
Fri November 2, 2012

It's All Politics, Nov. 1, 2012

Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Fri November 2, 2012 1:47 pm

  • Listen to the Roundup

Superstorm Sandy, the October Surprise no one anticipated, throws a monkey wrench into the final days of the campaign. NPR's Ken Rudin and Ron Elving spend the final pre-election podcast scouting the key presidential battleground states and have a forecast for control of the House and Senate in advance of Tuesday's voting.

Join NPR's Ron Elving and Ken Rudin for their pre-Election Day political roundup.

Economy
11:58 am
Fri November 2, 2012

What's The Priority: Unemployment Or Deficit?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE, from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Later in the program, Superstorm Sandy might've turned out the lights along the East Coast, but Twitter was ablaze with comments. We want to talk about the good, the bad and the ugly that Sandy brought out on social media. We'll have that conversation in a few minutes.

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Digital Life
11:58 am
Fri November 2, 2012

Why Some Spread Misinformation In Disasters

Superstorm Sandy turned out the lights along the Eastern Seaboard, but Twitter was ablaze with comments. Host Michel Martin looks at the good, the bad, and the ugly of social media during Sandy, including intentional hoaxes. She speaks with Rey Junco of the Harvard Berkman Center for Internet and Society about why some users spread misinformation.

The Two-Way
11:09 am
Fri November 2, 2012

Coast Guard Probing Tall Ship's Sinking; Captain Had Spoken About Hurricanes

The HMS Bounty as the tall ship sank Monday off the coast of North Carolina.
Petty Officer 2nd Class Tim Kuklewski/U.S. Coast Guard Getty Images

There's word from The Associated Press that the Coast Guard "has ordered a formal investigation into the sinking of a famous tall ship off the coast of North Carolina during Hurricane Sandy."

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It's All Politics
11:04 am
Fri November 2, 2012

Final Pre-Election Jobs Report Can Be Spun By Both Obama And Romney

President Obama gives a girl a high five at a campaign rally in Hilliard, Ohio, on Nov. 2.
Jewel Samad AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri November 2, 2012 1:20 pm

(Revised @ 12 p.m. ET)

The final monthly jobs report before Tuesday's general election contained something for both President Obama and Republican Mitt Romney to work into their closing arguments to voters.

For Obama, it was the news that the economy in October created significantly more jobs — 171,000 — than many economists had forecast. And the Labor Department revised upward the job numbers for September and August, suggesting even more underlying strength in the economy than earlier appeared to be the case.

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