National

Planet Money
10:57 am
Fri November 16, 2012

Hidden Housing Subsidy May Soon Come Out Of Hiding

Lam Thuy Vo NPR

Originally published on Fri November 16, 2012 2:47 pm

The federal government has all these ways of paying people to buy houses without actually, you know, paying people to buy houses.

We've talked a lot about two examples of this:

1. The mortgage-interest tax deduction is effectively a government payment to people who are paying a mortgage.

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The Two-Way
10:41 am
Fri November 16, 2012

Fiscal Cliff Talks Get Started

Getting started: President Obama and House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, at the start of today's meeting.
Larry Downing Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Fri November 16, 2012 12:13 pm

President Obama and congressional leaders from both major parties met at the White House this morning for the first of what will likely be many negotiations aimed at averting a plunge over the so-called fiscal cliff.

We watched for news from the key players — who include House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio — and updated with highlights.

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It's All Politics
8:46 am
Fri November 16, 2012

Can A Lame-Duck Congress Save The Day?

The Capitol on Monday, as Congress prepared to return for its post-election lame duck session.
Alex Brandon AP

Originally published on Tue December 4, 2012 7:23 pm

As the lame ducks waddle up to Capitol Hill for the final few weeks of this Congress, some political observers are hoping they will bring the "Spirit of 2010" with them.

Despite all the partisan bickering, the lame-duck session two years ago — bolstered by a bevy of outgoing Democrats with nothing to lose — actually got big things done, including the $850 billion stimulus and tax cut deal, a measure setting in motion the repeal of "don't ask, don't tell," passage of the defense authorization bill and an arms treaty.

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The Two-Way
8:25 am
Fri November 16, 2012

Petraeus Supports White House On Post-Benghazi Accounts, Lawmakers Say

Sept. 11: The U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya, was aflame after coming under attack.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri November 16, 2012 12:44 pm

  • Dina Temple-Raston on 'Morning Edition'
(We added a new top to this post at 12:40 p.m. ET to round up the latest developments.)

The White House did not insert politics into the process of determining what could be said about the Sept. 11 attack on the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya, in the days immediately afterward, former CIA Director David Petraeus told Congress this morning, according to lawmakers who were inside closed briefings today.

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It's All Politics
3:26 am
Fri November 16, 2012

In California, 'Republican' Is Becoming A Toxic Label

Citizens vote in Los Angeles County on Nov. 6.
Frederic J. Brown AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri March 21, 2014 4:12 pm

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Superstorm Sandy: Before, During And Beyond
3:25 am
Fri November 16, 2012

Want To Help Sandy Victims? Send Cash, Not Clothes

Volunteers sort through donated clothes in Sea Bright, N.J.
Pam Fessler NPR

Originally published on Fri November 16, 2012 4:47 am

Whenever there's a disaster, people want to give, and Hurricane Sandy is no exception. According to The Chronicle of Philanthropy, U.S. charities collected more than $174 million in donations as of Nov. 9 to help respond to the storm.

But it's not only money that has been pouring in. Relief programs have also received mountains of clothes, food and other supplies, not all of which are needed.

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It's All Politics
5:46 pm
Thu November 15, 2012

Geography, Not Gerrymandering, May Explain GOP's Hold On House

A man votes on Nov. 6 in Chicago.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu November 15, 2012 6:10 pm

Some Democrats complain that Republicans in recent decades have had the edge in House races because GOP state legislatures have been better at the gerrymandering game. Except that may not be true.

Some political experts believe there's an easier explanation, and perhaps a tougher one for Democrats to overcome: Voters supporting Republican House candidates, they say, are spread over more congressional districts than those who support Democrats. It's that simple. It's merely a matter of geography.

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Shots - Health News
5:38 pm
Thu November 15, 2012

Health Exchange Activity Heats Up As Deadline Is Extended

Nebraska Gov. Dave Heineman announced Thursday that his state will choose the federal health insurance exchange program.
Nati Harnik AP

Originally published on Thu November 15, 2012 7:45 pm

There's nothing quite like a deadline to focus the mind. Even a deadline that's not quite real.

Friday was originally the day that states were supposed to not only tell the federal government whether they planned to run their own health exchanges but also how they planned to do it.

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Superstorm Sandy: Before, During And Beyond
5:30 pm
Thu November 15, 2012

In Sandy's Wake, A Reshaped Coastline

Sandy punched a hole in the barrier island that holds the affluent borough of Mantoloking, N.J., temporarily splitting the community in two. The storm also destroyed several multimillion-dollar homes and erased the island's protective system of dunes.
Doug Mills AP

Originally published on Fri November 16, 2012 11:55 am

New Jersey's most affluent community, Mantoloking, sits on a narrow barrier island 30 miles north of Long Beach. As Sandy approached, most of the residents fled inland. But Edwin C. O'Malley and his father, Edwin J. O'Malley Jr., hunkered down in their 130-year-old house.

They tied a boat to their porch and then watched the storm surge break over the dunes and flood the streets.

"Overnight that night, lying in bed, I could actually hear waves hitting the side of the house — which obviously made it more difficult to get to sleep," the younger O'Malley says.

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It's All Politics
5:20 pm
Thu November 15, 2012

As Dust Settles, Voters Cite Campaign's Negativity

Lynn Armstrong Coffin and Eric Papalini box with puppets depicting Mitt Romney and President Obama in Sarasota, Fla., in September.
Chris O'Meara AP

Originally published on Thu November 15, 2012 5:22 pm

Voters were frustrated by a 2012 presidential race they called more negative than usual and more devoid of substantive discussion of issues, according to a survey released Thursday by the Pew Research Center.

And voters are pessimistic about the prospect of a more productive Congress, Pew found.

Two-thirds of registered voters surveyed after Election Day said they believe relations between Democrats and Republicans will stay the same or worsen over the coming year.

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