National

Politics
12:08 pm
Fri April 4, 2014

Enrollment Numbers Put Obamacare Battle To Rest?

Originally published on Fri April 4, 2014 12:31 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Now it's time for our political chat. This week there's a lot to talk about. The Supreme Court struck down some campaign contribution limits. The White House beat it's a goal of 7 million Americans signed up for coverage through the Affordable Care Act, and Republican Congressman Paul Ryan debuted his own budget proposal, something that could be a blueprint for a White House run in 2016. So joining us to help us unpack those political headlights is Corey Dade.

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The Salt
12:04 pm
Fri April 4, 2014

Tasting French Fries For A Living Can Be A Pain In The Mouth

Food companies invest heavily in running their products through taste tests with trained sensory panelists. Here, a blind taste testing event at McDonald's headquarters in Oak Brook, Ill., in 2012.
Bloomberg/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu April 10, 2014 8:18 am

Behind all of the mass-produced food that's churned out by fast-food restaurants and cafeterias is a hidden army of workers: professional taste testers, or "sensory panelists." Their job is to evaluate every aspect of a food product — from the texture to the spice combination to the salt levels — before it hits consumers' plates.

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The Two-Way
7:45 am
Fri April 4, 2014

Fort Hood MP Hailed As Hero For Confronting Shooter

Bob Butler (left) and Bob Gordon paint crosses they placed in front of American flags at Central Christian Disciples of Christ church in the city of Killeen, Texas, which is home to Fort Hood.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 4, 2014 10:16 am

As investigators try to determine why Army Spc. Ivan Lopez would open fire on his fellow soldiers at Fort Hood, Texas, stories are emerging about the harrowing minutes on the post Wednesday and what are being described as the heroic actions of the military police officer who confronted the gunman.

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Code Switch
7:06 am
Fri April 4, 2014

Who's Boosting Box Office Numbers? Report Says Latinos

Cesar Chavez pulled in $3 million at the box office last weekend and did noticeably better in areas where the farmworkers advocate was most active.
Courtesy of Lionsgate

According to a recent report published by the Motion Picture Association of America, Latinos went to the movies in 2013 way more often than other ethnic groups in the U.S. relative to their population.

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Around the Nation
5:07 am
Fri April 4, 2014

'Desert Sun' Probes Marine Deaths On Highway Near Calif. Base

Originally published on Fri April 4, 2014 8:29 am

Since 2007, more Marines from the Twentynine Palms Marine base in California have died in the U.S. than in the war-torn Middle East. Steve Inskeep talks to reporter Brett Kelman of The Desert Sun.

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Around the Nation
5:02 am
Fri April 4, 2014

Second Deadly Shooting At Fort Hood Raises Multiple Questions

Originally published on Fri April 4, 2014 8:22 am

Attention is focused on the mental state of Army Specialist Ivan Lopez, who's accused of killing 3 people and injuring 16 at Fort Hood on Wednesday. A verbal altercation may have lead to the shooting.

StoryCorps
3:15 am
Fri April 4, 2014

A Brooklyn Boy Who Lost A Life, But Helped Save Others

Elisa and Bobby Seeger remember their son, Aidan, on a visit to StoryCorps in Brooklyn.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri April 4, 2014 10:43 am

Last year, New York became the first state to require newborn screening for a genetic disorder called adrenoleukodystrophy, or ALD. The disorder rapidly attacks the nervous system. The most common form of ALD mainly affects young boys and can be fatal within a year.

But if ALD is detected in newborns, a bone marrow transplant can help them survive. The legislation is known as "Aidan's Law" for Aidan Jack Seeger, who died from ALD in 2012 at age 7.

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Politics
5:39 pm
Thu April 3, 2014

For Political Conventions, Another Balloon Bursts

President Obama stands on stage with Vice President Biden and their families after accepting the party nomination during the final day of the 2012 Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, N.C.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 7:34 pm

There's news today about the 2016 presidential campaign that has nothing to do with the growing list of would-be candidates with White House aspirations.

It's about the big nominating conventions the Democrats and Republicans hold every four years. Legislation the president signed Thursday afternoon means those huge political extravaganzas will no longer receive millions of dollars in taxpayer support. It's not the only change that's likely for conventions.

Let's start with a little time travel:

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Sports
4:43 pm
Thu April 3, 2014

Should The NCAA Change Its Rules To Pay For Play?

University of Miami President Donna Shalala cuts down the net after a basketball game against Clemson last year.
J Pat Carter AP

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 7:34 pm

In the next few days, the last four teams play for the NCAA men's basketball championship, a hugely profitable event for college sports.

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Sports
4:43 pm
Thu April 3, 2014

Basketball Prep Schools: A World Of Their Own, And Recruiting Worldwide

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 7:34 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

With the Final Four happening this weekend, there's a lot of attention on young basketball players and the high schools that produced them. Some of the best athletes emerge from schools that never win state championships because they operate outside of state athletic associations. In the basketball world they are called prep schools.

Alexandra Starr takes us to one such school, Our Savior New American on Long Island.

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