Music

Maracuyá means "passion fruit" in Spanish. For the DJ collective Maracuyeah, it's all about a passion for music — and connection.

At the D.C.-based group's fifth anniversary party, the dance floor at Judy's Bar & Restaurant is packed with a diverse crowd, from punk artists to recently arrived immigrants and buttoned-down, office types. Nohora Arrieta Fernandez, a Ph.D. student at Georgetown University who identifies as Afro-Colombian, says there's something for everyone here.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Miles Ahead

In celebration of the release of the Miles Davis film Miles Ahead at Cinematique of Wilmington this week, WHQR 91.3 FM will broadcast a new one hour radio special tonight, Tuesday, June 7th at 8 pm.

The special includes interviews with the film's director and star, Don Cheadle, film composer and pianist Robert Glasper, plus Miles’ son, Erin Davis, and nephew, Vince Wilburn, Jr. The special also includes several of Miles Davis’ classics, including "Seven Steps to Heaven," "Miles Ahead," and "So What." 

It's not quite right to say the news came as a shock when the Metropolitan Opera announced Thursday that Yannick Nézet-Séguin would become the house's new music director, beginning in the 2020-21 season. He follows in the footsteps of James Levine, who said in April that he was stepping down after leading the Met for four decades.

Soup to Nuts Live! welcomes long-time veteran of the Chicago blues music scene, Jon McDonald, on Thursday, June 23rd in the MC Erny Gallery at WHQR.

Barry Douglas knows a few things about handing down traditions. In this Tiny Desk performance, he passes along the musical heritage of his Irish homeland in the form of old Celtic songs he's arranged for solo piano.

Composer and author Paul Bowles first went to Morocco in 1931. He fell in love with the country, returning often and eventually moving to Tangier, where he lived from 1947 until his death in 1999. Among the things Bowles valued most about Morocco was its varieties of music.

On Thursday, May 19th local folk rock group The Midatlantic performed in the MC Erny Gallery at WHQR. On Friday, June 10th and Saturday June 11th, will air our Soup to Nuts Live! concert with The Midatlantic. Tune into HQR 91.3 to hear The Midatlantic's brand of music that combines progressive folk, Americana, bluegrass, and a hint of rock and jazz.

Friday, June 10th at 7 pm

Saturday, June 11th at 9 pm

Copyright 2016 WWNO-FM. To see more, visit WWNO-FM.

When the New York City Opera (NYCO) announced its final performances and imminent bankruptcy in September 2013, opera lovers, not just in Manhattan, were shocked.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Hey, Hey, It's 50 Years Of The Monkees!

May 23, 2016

The surviving members of The Monkees are about to celebrate their 50th anniversary. To mark the occasion, they're releasing a new album, titled Good Times! Here, NPR's Stephen Thompson tells Ari Shapiro about "Me & Magdalena," a new song written for the album by Ben Gibbard of Death Cab For Cutie.

Looking for a musically sensitive, responsive bandmate? Maybe you should try out Shimon.

The ongoing controversy in North Carolina over access to bathrooms has increased the general public's awareness of issues facing transgender people. One thing you might not think about is voice: How does that essential tool of communication change with gender transition? It's something that has deep emotional and psychological resonance. It's also something that's playing out in a growing number of transgender choruses across the country.

As a young child growing up in South Africa, Gillian Power sang in school and church choirs.

Watch A Long-Lost Video For Vivien Goldman's 'Launderette'

May 20, 2016

In 1981, Vivien Goldman was a writer for the London music weekly Sounds and a sometime backup singer. In the shadows of Thatcher and the wake of The Sex Pistols, subcultures and dub cultures were mingling and merging in her Ladbroke Grove neighborhood; her neighbors included Joe Strummer and the reggae band Aswad.

The Estonians are serious about singing. The power of human voices practically propelled the small Baltic country to independence during the Soviet era. In the late 1980s, hundreds of thousands of Estonians routinely gathered to perform forbidden patriotic songs. The events energized the nation, leading to what was called the "Singing Revolution."

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Note: NPR's First Listen audio comes down after the album is released. However, you can still listen with the Spotify playlist at the bottom of the page.

The scene was electric at the B.B. King Blues Club in Times Square as Bunny Wailer, 69 years old, took the stage before a capacity crowd.

Born Neville Livingston, Bunny is the last living original member of the legendary reggae group The Wailers, which he founded along with Peter Tosh and Bob Marley in the early 1960s.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

One of the world's best-known and best-loved classical musicians has joined the ranks of artists refusing to perform in North Carolina. Violinist Itzhak Perlman canceled an appearance scheduled for Wednesday with the North Carolina Symphony in Raleigh to protest HB2, the controversial North Carolina law limiting civil rights protections for LGBT people.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

At White House state dinners, it's customary for a president to nod to the strengths and contributions of guest countries. And when hosting Nordic nations on Friday, President Obama paid tribute to a particular Finnish export.

Jane Little spent her long life making beautiful music, and she died this weekend doing just what she loved, onstage. Little played with the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra for more than 71 years. She joined the symphony in 1945, when she was just 16.

When critics talk about Yuja Wang, they continue to reach for superlatives.

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