Music

World
5:03 pm
Fri June 1, 2012

Struggling U.S. Economy Drags Down The World

Slow economic growth in the U.S. is having an impact on many countries around the world. Here, people walk past a board flashing the Nikkei index on the Tokyo Stock Exchange in Japan last month.
Toru Yamanaka AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri June 1, 2012 5:38 pm

The sputtering U.S. economy isn't just bad news for America, it's a drag on the global economic outlook as well.

"What matters to the rest of the world is the amount of demand the United States is going to generate," says economist Eswar Prasad, a professor of trade policy at Cornell.

"Weak job growth translates to weak domestic demand in the U.S., and that concerns all of the U.S.'s major trading partners," he says.

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Shots - Health Blog
4:47 pm
Fri June 1, 2012

As Nations Develop, Cancer Takes Hold

No corner of the world is safe from cancer.
iStockphoto

Cancer is everywhere.

And, before long, cancer will be a major cause of death in every part of the world, not just a big factor in what's now the developed world.

In 2030 the world's population is expected to hit 8.3 billion, up from 7 billion today. By then, new cases of cancer cases are expected to nearly double to 20.3 million from 12.8 million in 2008, according to an analysis in The Lancet Oncology.

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It's All Politics
4:32 pm
Fri June 1, 2012

Roberts' Legacy And The Health Care Law

Chief Justice John Roberts
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Originally published on Fri June 1, 2012 5:02 pm

In just a few weeks, a decision is expected from the Supreme Court on the constitutionality of President Obama's health care law. Some legal analysts expect the justices to strike down the law, or at least the controversial individual mandate. And whatever the court decides, it could come in a 5-4 decision.

A few of these analysts discussed the implications of a split decision in this high-profile case with NPR's Neal Conan Thursday on Talk of the Nation.

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Planet Money
4:27 pm
Fri June 1, 2012

How To Kill A Currency

A one-crown note from the Austro-Hungarian empire.
Wikimedia Commons

Originally published on Mon June 4, 2012 12:25 pm

As the world considers the possible death of the euro, it's worth considering a famous historical example. Ok, it's not that famous. But it's still worth looking at: The break-up of the Austro-Hungarian currency union in 1918.

Just as the countries of Europe today share the euro, the Austrian empire and the Kingdom of Hungary had created a shared currency: the Austro-Hungarian crown.

After World War I, the region broke up. All of a sudden there were lots of countries wanting to switch to their own currencies.

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The Two-Way
4:15 pm
Fri June 1, 2012

As The Worm Turns: Cybersecurity Expert Tracks Blowback From Stuxnet

Iran's Bushehr nuclear power plant, shown in this International Iran Photo Agency image from August 2010, was infected by the Stuxnet computer worm — which reportedly was created in the United States.
Ebrahim Norouzi AP

The CIA has a term called "blowback" to describe when an operation against the enemy has unintended negative consequences for the U.S. or its allies. In the age of cyberwarfare, blowback seems to be a paramount concern.

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The Two-Way
4:01 pm
Fri June 1, 2012

Facebook Will Allow Users To Vote On Privacy Changes

Facebook's logo.
Emmanuel Dunand AFP/Getty Images

Facebook will ask its nearly 1 billion users to vote up or down on changes to its privacy policy.

According to a statement released by the social network, the company also put changes up for a vote in 2009. Voting begins today and goes through June 8.

"If more than 30 percent of all active registered users vote, the results will be binding," Facebook said. "If turnout is less than 30 percent, the vote will be advisory."

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Music Interviews
3:57 pm
Fri June 1, 2012

How An Author And A Singer Became Musical 'Kin'

The new album Kin is a collaboration between author Mary Karr and singer-songwriter Rodney Crowell.
Deborah Feingold Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri June 1, 2012 6:13 pm

In 2003, in a song called "Earthbound," singer Rodney Crowell name-checked a writer he admires a lot: Mary Karr, who has written searing memoirs, including the best-seller The Liars' Club, as well as several books of poetry.

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Middle East
3:35 pm
Fri June 1, 2012

Egypt Braces For Verdict In Hosni Mubarak Trial

Supporters of Mubarak in Cairo chant slogans and carry his portrait as they demonstrate in February during his trial, outside the police academy.
Carsten Koall Getty Images

Originally published on Fri June 1, 2012 6:13 pm

An Egyptian court plans to announce the verdict Saturday in the trial of former President Hosni Mubarak, and regardless of which way the decision goes, it could prompt a public outpouring of emotion at a sensitive moment for the country.

Mubarak is charged with corruption and complicity in the deaths of hundreds of protesters during the revolution last year that ousted him.

If convicted, he could face the death penalty. But some are predicting he'll be acquitted, and that could set off another round of protests and possibly violence.

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Monkey See
3:03 pm
Fri June 1, 2012

Diablo III: A Sequel Worth Waiting For

Blizzard

With the exception of a few companies, the videogame industry is currently suffering from a remarkable decline in revenue, and one reason for those lackluster sales is the plethora of sequels on the market. Each year sees a new version of an old game, and that can become both tiresome and annoying when the price for just one game is $60.

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Europe
3:00 pm
Fri June 1, 2012

As Greeks Withdraw Cash, Banks Grow Vulnerable

Many Greeks fear that the value of their savings will drop sharply if the country leaves the eurozone and returns to the drachma. This has led many Greeks to withdraw their money from banks.
John Kolesidis Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Fri June 1, 2012 6:13 pm

Since the Greek debt crisis began nearly three years ago, more than $90 billion has left the country.

At first, it was just big business and the wealthiest Greeks moving money abroad in case Greece dropped the euro and reverted to its previous currency, the drachma.

Now people with smaller portfolios are also withdrawing money, and that's left the country's fragile banks on edge.

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