LGBT

Park View Project

In Wilmington in 1990, 32-year-old lesbian Talana Kreeger was brutally murdered. Tab Ballis, a Licensed Clinical Social Worker, has been working on a film to tell Talana's story for 10 years: Park View ("Park View" was the name of the lesbian bar where Talana met her murderer on Carolina Beach Road). The initiating director of the film was Ingrid Jungermann, former Wilmington resident who is now an award-winning filmmaker in New York. The soundtrack is by Wilmington singer/songerwriter Laura McLean

Wikimedia Commons

  North Carolina’s state legislature passed HB2 earlier this year, otherwise known as the “Bathroom Bill”, and unwittingly launched a broader, national conversation about how public policy impacts minorities – specifically people who are transgender.  Performers canceled concerts, companies shelved plans to move to or expand in North Carolina, and revenue from tourism dropped. 

Chalmers Butterfield

Health disparities between white America and racial and ethnic minorities are well-documented.  The American Psychological Association says those disparities continue into the senior years – with minorities less likely to get medical help – and more likely to face chronic diseases such as obesity and diabetes.   But race isn’t the only determining factor for seniors who struggle with access to adequate health care.

St. Jude’s Metropolitan Community Church was born 20 years ago out of one basic need:  to find an accepting place to bury the dead from Wilmington’s gay and lesbian community.  Amanda Greene of Wilmington Faith and Values reports how the church has grown and increased its focus on human rights issues.