Kure Beach

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

New Hanover County collected more than ten million dollars in room occupancy tax during the last fiscal year.  But officials in Kure Beach aren’t convinced that all property owners who rent on a short-term basis are sending their share to the County. 

At a recent CoastLine Candidate Forum for Kure Beach, held September 16th in WHQR's MC Erny Gallery, everyone agreed the status quo isn’t working.    

New Hanover County ranked 8th last year for tourism out of all 100 counties in North Carolina.   

Seismic testing and the potential for offshore drilling has galvanized strong opposition in Kure Beach.  Earlier this year, Mayor Dean Lambeth ignited controversy after he sent a letter in support of seismic testing to the Federal agency overseeing offshore oil exploration.  Hundreds of opponents showed up to protest at the next Kure Beach Town meeting in January.  

Town of Kure Beach

In this first CoastLine Candidate Forum of 2015, we bring you the four candidates running for Kure Beach Mayor and Town Council.

In the Town of Kure Beach, two candidates are competing for the mayoral seat.  On the council side, two candidates are running unopposed for two open seats. 

Kure Beach Town Council Members serve staggered four-year terms. The Mayor serves a two-year term.  Members are elected in a non-partisan election every two years.  

Candidates for mayor:  

Courtesy City of Wilmington

The only Mayoral contest in New Hanover County was in Carolina Beach – where newcomer Dan Wilcox ousted incumbent Bob Lewis by just five votes. 

LeAnn Pierce, owner of a small hotel in Carolina Beach, won the most votes and will join the re-elected Gary Doetch on Town Council.

In Kure Beach, Dean Lambeth, who ran unopposed for Mayor kept his seat.  And the two council candidates – Craig Blozsinsky and Steve Pagley - won the two open seats on Kure Beach Town Council.

Kure Beach Aims to Keep its Tourist Appeal in Check

Oct 23, 2013


This November, two town council candidates and incumbent mayor Dean Lambeth are all running unopposed in Kure Beach. Of top concern to this beach town is the question of how to strike a balance between preserving its quaint and quiet nature—a major reason many residents chose to live there—while still profiting from tourist dollars. Kure Beach’s newly opened Ocean Front Park is intensifying this issue.

Five candidates are running for two seats on the Wrightsville Beach Board of Aldermen this November. Of top concern to the town is impending legislation that would increase its home and business owners’ flood insurance rates. The two alderman hopefuls who attended last night’s beach town forum at WHQR are both campaigning on their mission to delay implementation of the Biggert-Waters Flood Insurance Reform Act. This federal law is meant to recover recent losses to FEMA’s Flood Insurance Program, and stands to significantly raise local insurance rates.