journalism

Have you seen headlines in your Facebook feed or at the bottom of an article that reads, “Hillary Clinton meets Osama Bin Laden” – with a picture of the two shaking hands?  Or “President Obama’s daughter, Malia, is pregnant”?  Or “The process to impeach Donald Trump has begun”?  Just to be clear, all of those stories are false.  Hillary Clinton’s picture was photoshopped; Malia’s teen pregnancy and Donald Trump’s impeachment are both patently false.  It’s fake news. 

From Free Press/ Free Press Action Fund, Flickr Creative Commons: https://www.flickr.com/photos/freepress/6641427981/in/photolist-b7T49Z-RCoFCA-SaEHaS-ShrjQ4-RBXjcu-R48wma-R5GJn2-69VWz6-9RvvjZ-qiVGwn-RZBVXC-S2VBao-4ro6ez-SeWkkJ-sBkT9o-R855dC-axchBk-66BXuS

On this week's CoastLine, Rachel Lewis Hilburn sat down with David Pernell, who teaches journalism at the University of North Carolina at Wilmington, as well as WECT anchor Jon Evans to discuss fake news. According to Evans and Pernell, the trick isn't just avoiding overtly fake news, but also seeking out different viewpoints, instead of listening to your own echo chamber.