Jeff Hovis

In gearing up to apply for a ninety-million-dollar grant to revitalize a huge swath of the city, the Wilmington Housing Authority made a loud plea for citizen involvement. And it’s now being answered. Nearly one hundred people—from public housing residents to local business leaders—are volunteering to serve on sub-committees dedicated to making Wilmington’s application as competitive as it can be.

Wilmington's Hillcrest Community is a medium-sized public development. / WHA

The Wilmington Housing Authority is moving full-speed toward its goal of getting a thirty-million-dollar federal grant to revitalize Hillcrest—and it’s seeking public input. If awarded a competitive Choice Neighborhood Grant, the Authority will be working with the community to improve not only the public housing project, but the city spanning Third to Fifteenth, and Castle to Martin streets.

Wilmington's Hillcrest Community is a medium-sized public development. / WHA

For the first time ever, the Wilmington Housing Authority is applying for a competitive, thirty-million-dollar grant from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, or HUD—and they want to make it a community affair. Today the Housing Authority gathered city and county leaders at the Hillcrest development to strategize on winning a Choice Neighborhood Grant. It’s part of an effort, as WHQR’s Katie O’Reilly reports, to transform housing projects into areas indistinguishable from the surrounding city.

As of this  morning, the Wilmington Housing Authority is in new hands. Following CEO Michael Krause’s arrest Sunday for driving with a blood alcohol level measuring more than four times the legal limit, the Authority’s board of commissioners has terminated him. The charge marked Krause’s second DWI since taking the position in 2008. Vernice Hamilton, the Authority’s director of human resources, will step up as interim CEO.

Wilmington Downtown Inc.

Downtown Wilmington is about to see another new hotel go up.