Hurricane Preparedness

National Hurricane Center

No one can say with certainty yet how much Hurricane Joaquin will impact the Cape Fear region.  But at the very least, serious flooding is high on the probability scale.

There a few reasons for that.  Steven Pfaff is a Warning Coordination Meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Wilmington.  He says the situation that’s unfolding now is complex.  If Joaquin stays on the current track, this area could see breezy conditions along the coast – but, says Pfaff, it’s the potential for flooding that’s a serious concern. 

National Hurricane Center

The movement of Tropical Storm Erika northward has the southeastern United States on alert.  But whether Erika peters out over land or survives and re-groups, peak hurricane season is upon us. 

According to the National Hurricane Center, most tropical storms and hurricanes in the Atlantic Basin happen between mid-August and late October. 

And now residents in Brunswick County have a new emergency notification system available, launched over the summer, called CodeRED.   During sign-up, residents can choose whether to receive messages via phone call, text, or email. 

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)

The 2015 hurricane season begins Monday, June 1. And although the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration—or NOAA—predicts a slower season than usual, that doesn’t mean coastal residents can let down their guard.

Though estimates are low for this hurricane season, those numbers do not reflect the potential impact to the region. That’s according to Michael Colby, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service.

As National Flood Safety Week draws to a close, the predictions for spring are here. 

Homeowners’ insurance rates are going up in North Carolina  effective July 1st.   Insurance Commissioner Wayne Goodwin says the actual increase is less than half of what insurance companies requested. 

And while barrier islands in North Carolina will see the biggest hikes, the Cape Fear region is just slightly above the statewide average.   

courtesy: NOAA

An above-average hurricane season – meaning more intense storms – and more of them – is likely.