film incentives

Billy Hathorn

It didn’t take long for local film workers to see a drop in production after North Carolina legislators re-structured the incentive – changing it from a tax rebate to a fixed grant fund. 

Isabelle Shepherd

The legislature is out of Raleigh, but, the jury may not be out on economic incentives, including those supporting North Carolina’s film industry. 

The City of Wilmington and New Hanover County leaders plan to write to Governor Pat McCrory, asking him to reconvene the legislative session to make a final decision on economic incentives.  Wilmington Mayor Bill Saffo says this is a bigger issue than just film; he wants to protect job development grants, which incentivize companies to bring their business to North Carolina:  

Andrew Sleet

Some state legislators say they don’t see the positive economic impact of film in North Carolina.  Wilmington’s film community is coming together to show them the big picture.

NC House Moves to Maintain Current Film Tax Rebate

Jul 31, 2014
AiClassEland at en.wikibooks [CC-BY-SA-2.5 (www.creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5)], from Wikimedia Commons

A film incentive grant program is included in the current budget compromise. But an amendment proposed by Republican Representative Ted Davis from New Hanover County would maintain the existing structure of the film tax rebate for one year. The proposal passed the House during Thursday's session by a wide margin.

Ted Davis’ amendment to Senate Bill 763 would extend the current tax rebates for one year, which would allow time for an independent study to be completed.

Betsy Jordan / Rick Catlin

Betsy Jordan, who is Rick Catlin’s Democratic opponent for the North Carolina House of Representatives, has already identified her signature issue: film. WHQR’s Isabelle Shepherd reports.

District 20’s Republican incumbent, Rick Catlin, has voted to convert the film tax rebate to a grant program. But his challenger, Betsy Jordan, says this isn’t enough to keep North Carolina competitive in the film industry.

Listener Dory wrote:

I prefer public radio formats in which there are two stations--one news/talk programming and one music programming. Since the second WHQR station is HD (and not available to all), it makes sense to mix news and music programming on the flagship station. However, I'd love it if the music was more diverse--indie music, singer-songwriters, Alt-Latino, "college music." As it stands, the music programming seems almost entirely focused on older demographics.

Anonymous wrote:

As state legislators continue to hammer out the budget, citizens of all political persuasions are awaiting word on the fate of this region’s bustling film business. And that’s why this morning, a contingent of officials and residents from the Wilmington area gathered in Raleigh’s legislative building to plead with lawmakers to extend the current film incentive tax credits—instead of switching to a grant program, which they say would eliminate jobs. But rather than demonstrating film’s bona fides within the Cape Fear region, local lawmakers focused on its statewide benefits.

Wilmington Regional Film Commission

The film community in North Carolina is holding its collective breath while House leaders consider budget amendments.  

Billy Hathorn

Film incentives are the ticket to keeping more than four-thousand full-time jobs in the state.  That was a central theme Wednesday morning in Raleigh during a press conference where state and city leaders, film industry workers, and industry supporters gathered to celebrate Film Day at the General Assembly. 

The question of whether competitive film incentives continue in North Carolina will be answered by the end of the current short session of the General Assembly. 

Pages