Education

Isabelle Shepherd, WHQR

The General Assembly approved a temporary budget at the end of June before taking a week-long recess. The delay prompted a local protest from teachers, teaching assistants, and parents. 

North Carolina’s delayed budget leaves many school systems in limbo as they plan for the upcoming year. The House’s proposed budget maintains current funding levels for teaching assistants, but, according to News & Observer, the Senate’s plan could eliminate over eight thousand teaching assistant jobs.

This broadcast of CoastLine originally aired on July 16, 2014.  

Charter Schools in North Carolina:  What role should they play within the public school system and how is that role changing?  

During a time when every dollar spent on public education is scrutinized, lawmakers, parents, and advocacy groups alike are asking:  are charter schools effectively expanding options in the public school system?  Are they bridging an achievement gap?  Or are they siphoning taxpayer resources from traditional public schools? 

Isabelle Shepherd, WHQR

In a Wilmington classroom, students transform into some surprising characters—healers, mages, and warriors. WHQR’s Isabelle Shepherd reports that a virtual game is preparing fourth grade math students at Alderman Elementary School for the real world. 

Toth: “Alright, let’s take a seat real quick because we have a busy day.”

Students: “Yay! Yay! I like busy.”

WHQR, Isabelle Shepherd

In a Wilmington classroom, a math teacher is using new technology to turn learning into a game. And in order to succeed in the world of Classcraft, an online, educational role-playing program, teamwork is key.

In Brian Toth’s fourth grade math classes, the students are split into teams and assigned roles. In the game, they can be mages, warriors, or healers. By doing well in class, students gain experience points, and if they behave badly, they take damage, which leads to negative consequences.

Sixty-Six Million

Nov 4, 2014
Fidias Reyes

Fresh Voices on Air commentator Shelby Hudson explores the freedoms we have compared to those of girls living in oppressive situations.    

Shelby Hudson is 15 years old and a sophomore at New Hanover High School.  She is a member of the New Hanover High School women's golf team and plays for the Cape  Fear volleyball national team.  Shelby hopes to gain admission into University of Pennsylvania's neonatal nurse practitioner program.   

Alexa Doran

Tonia Lovejoy is an educator and explorer who has created an organization called the Beautiful Nation Project. Its website offers a hug array of tools on many platforms to expand our understanding of how where we live affects how we live. She will be taking an all female crew of scientists, explorers and educators on her sailboat for an around-the-world trip starting September 15. Their journey can be followed at BeautifulNationProject.org

As the federal government continues debating gun control, several local agencies gathered for a school safety summit in Wilmington on Tuesday at Cape Fear Community College. Attendees represented various organizations, from school administration and law enforcement, to mental health and the court system and  it marks the beginning of a community dialogue to assess school safety, focusing on prevention rather than a cure.

Republican Gubernatorial candidate Pat McCrory laid out his education platform Wednesday.

Governor Bev Perdue joined a meeting of principals and school counselors in Wilmington Thursday to, as WHQR’s Michelle Bliss reports, discuss the county’s new strategies for lowering the dropout rate and helping kids flip that tassel.  

The North Carolina New Schools Project, a joint private and public endeavor, is a recipient of the U.S. Department of Education’s “Investing in Innovation” award.