Cucalorus

Communique: Cucalorus 22 | November 9-13

Nov 8, 2016

Dan Brawley has been at the helm of Wilmington's Cucalorus Film Festival for 18 years (this is year 22 for the Fest). His leadership of Cucalorus has never become routine-the festival seems to be in continual manifestation, reaching out and building bridges between itself and everything else: Kidsalorus, Dancealorus, panels for entrepreneurs, innovators and dreamers, music, shadow puppets, comedy. You can choose to slip between reality and virtual reality. But most importantly, you can watch the films-260 of them

A performance collective from Chicago is coming to Wilmington this week to perform an intricate shadow show featuring paper puppets, live actors, and live music. The group is called Manual Cinema-an apt title for a shadow show that is like a movie made by hand in front of the audience in real time. We heard from one of the founders of Manual Cinema, Drew Dir, about the show, called Ada|Ava.

Cucalorus Connect is an important new element in this year's Cucalorus Film Festival slate.  It's an offering that organizers hope will support the synthesis of arts and business -- to empower entrepreneurs, introduce them to artists, and possibly even connect investors with start-ups. 

On this edition of CoastLine, we explore how the confluence of artists and businesspeople might change Cucalorus and whether, by association, it could change the Wilmington area. 

An alternate funding option for smaller filmmakers will soon be a reality in North Carolina.  Cucalorus, in partnership with the North Carolina Film Office, is announcing a new film incentive for projects with budgets under a quarter of a million dollars.

Once the popular tax-rebate form of the film incentive expired in North Carolina and legislators replaced it with a grant fund, film production in the state dropped significantly.  With those big-budget films and longer-running television series also went the support structure for smaller projects.  

Anthony Reynolds has been acting onscreen since 1993, but since 2001 he has also been producing films. His latest effort, an intense 22-minute short film called Times Like Dying, will be shown at Cucalorus on Thursday, November 13 at 7:15 at Thalian Hall. It is set in the mountains of NC in the year 1887, when the railroad is buying the farmer's land at a pittance to expand the railroad.  When the Dixon brothers won't sell to the bank someone kills all their cattle, and the situation only worsens from there. For more details visit Cucalorus.org

Today's guest, film festival programmer Shona Thomson is with us all the way from Edinburgh, Scotland.  Lucky us, Thomson is here for two weeks asartist-in-residence for the upcoming film festival, Cucalorus. In preparation for the much-beloved upcoming Cucalorus film festival, Thomson is here to tell us about two exciting events she has planned.

Staff

 

Today I talked with Dan Brawley, Director of the Cucalorus Film Foundation and Cucalorus Film Festival.  They have a fundraiser coming up Sunday night from 7:30 to midnight at EUE Screen Gems called An Evening on the Red Carpet.  Tickets available at Cucalorus.org

 

The film Bound By Sea will show Saturday, 10AM, at the Thalian Main Stage during the Cucalorus Film Festival. Guest host Pat Marriott interviewed Nate Daniel and Jack Viorel, the filmmakers and one of the stars of the locally produced movie. For more information on the film and the Cucalorus festival visit the Bound By Sea webpage on the Cucolorus website.

 

Dan Brawley is the director of Cucalorus, Wilmington’s homegrown but internationally known film festival. The festival is held in November, but submissions are being accepted right now.  There is also Surfalorus next week, and Cucalorus Camp in late July.  More details available at Cucalorus.org

In Cucalorus, Film and Dance Are Inseparable

Nov 8, 2012

Tonight in Wilmington, choreography meets film. In its seventh year, Dance-A-Lorus ignites the collaborative work of dancers and filmmakers and kicks off the Cucalorus Film Festival. WHQR’s Sara Wood reports the show has built momentum since its inception, and is one of the festival’s most anticipated events.

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