commentaries

McKay Savage / Wikimedia Commons

Nan Graham hopes to visit Irmo, South Carolina, in September to attend the annual Okra Strut. Nan is bearing down on her 24th year as a commentator on WHQR. She is grateful for the opportunity to address the burning issues of our time. 

You can hear more of Nan Graham's commentaries here.

WHQR Commentaries don't necessarily reflect the views of WHQR Radio, its staff, or its members.

The Children's Museum of Indianapolis [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

The holidays find our cities drenched in holiday decor. While trends fade, holiday beauty is forever. Commentator Shane Fernando describes the attraction of the aluminum Christmas tree and provides some caution when decorating with such vibrancy.

It's been a rollercoaster of a week and WHQR commentator Peggy Porter has a few thoughts on the election and its immediate aftermath.

Penmanship is an art form soon to be lost. Commentator Philip Gerard explores how writing cues memories, personality and connectivity.

Commentator Annie Gray Johnston lightens the spirit of Election Day 2016 by describing life in The White House with either presidential candidate's occupancy.

When Gunter Grass  published his memoir Peeling the Onion in 2006,  he revealed that the life story he had written and retold for years was false, and rocked the world. He quite candidly admitted that, contrary to what everyone thought they knew about his life, he was in fact part of the Waffen-SS. It was the literary bombshell of the time. The possibility of revoking his Nobel prize was raised. 

By Rodrigo Barreto de Oliveira [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

For WHQR Commentator, Nan Graham, the popular October/Halloween mantra "Boo!" has a triple meaning: 

By Tom Arthur from Orange, CA, United States (vote for better tape) [CC BY-SA 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

With election day a mere six weeks away, our Commentator Peggy Porter has a few thoughts on how to make your experience smoother.

Our beloved pets' instincts can wind up complicating our lives and impacting us in ways we never thought possible. WHQR commentator Annie Gray Johnston explains how her dog Maybelline gave her the fright of her life after sniffing around a particularly precious backyard area.

By Cyprien Lomas originally posted to Flickr as Northern Washington CC BY-SA 2.0 via Wikimedia Commons

Growing up in a self-described "household of literary snobs," Gwenyfar Rohler recounts the memories that formed the foundation for her love of books and framed her distaste for certain authors.

By Karthikeyan 3d (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

When it comes to memories, the most impactful remembrances are often triggered by the most ordinary of physical objects. In Shane Fernando's case, memories of his Sri Lankan grandmother are warmed by the light of his father's coconut oil lamp. The lamp tells a story of not only Shane's memories, but also the legacy his father's family.

There are many times in a persons life where every detail can be recalled -- memories have the extraordinary ability to pervade every one of our senses. In some cases, these memories are welcomed: fond recollections of yesteryear. In other cases, these pinpointed moments are not as attractive and are due to something we were not expecting. Commentator Annie Gray Johnston discusses how personal news has renewed her view of the world around her.

Annie Gray Johnston is a General Enthusiast and Free Lance Nut.

visitcherokeenc.com

 

Annual holiday trips into the western mountains of North Carolina wouldn't be complete without a stop in at the retro mountain attraction, located in Cherokee, NC – Santa’s Land – home of the famous Rudi-Coast.    

Commentator Shane Fernando is Director of the Humanities and Fine Arts Center at CFCC. He lives with his husband in Downtown Wilmington.

WHQR Commentaries don't necessarily reflect the views of WHQR Radio, its editorial staff, or its members.

Annie Gray Johnston

Recent events have had many of us searching for signs of basic human goodness. But finding such a sign in the plastic wave of a mannequin? Commentator Annie Gray Johnson explains.

What is the perfect time to read The Grapes of Wrath? What about The Catcher in the Rye? This week Commentator Gwenyfar Rohler reminds us that the same book can offer a vastly different experience depending on who we are when we read it.

learnnc.org

As tropical storm Colin brings heavy rain to our area, Commentator Shane Fernando remembers a hurricane camp-out at WHQR.


For Commentator Philip Gerard, the retirement of the Ringling Brothers performing elephants conjured a memory of his own encounter with elephants.


"The Camels are coming! I know, the song really refers to the Scots, but I couldn't resist the title," says Commentator Nan Graham. A two-part story to be continued.


The site of childhood memories can make us instantly nostalgic. Recently, commentator Annie Gray Johnston was forced to let go of one of these sites.

Annie Gray Johnston is a General Enthusiast and Free Lance Nut.

WHQR Commentaries don't necessarily reflect the views of WHQR Radio, its editorial staff, or it members.

www.surlalunefairytales.com

That which we call a rose, by any other name, would smell as sweet. No so fast, Juliet, says Commentator Gwenyfar Rohler. Names may have more power than we think.


www.karaokekontrol.com

What's the best way to get to know a group of people? Does the answer change if everyone doesn't speak the same language? Shane Fernando suggests that no matter where you are, nothing beats a song.


www.greatergreaterwashington.org

This week, from Commentator Philip Gerard, a parable, set in childhood on a web of roads near Washington D.C.

Philip Gerard is the author of eleven documentary scripts, numerous short stories and essays, and ten books, including his new novel, The Dark of the Island. He teaches in the Creative Writing Department at UNC Wilmington.

www.wikipedia.org

Our language, ever-changing, is packed with surprising tidbits from history; eponyms. Named for a person, or event, they're a kind of immortality. Until the next thing comes along. So says Commentator Nan Graham.


www.lasvegas.com

This week commentator Annie Gray makes it clear, "What happens in Vegas stays in Vegas" is a rule she chooses to ignore.

Annie Gray Johnston is a General Enthusiast and Free Lance Nut.

WHQR Commentaries don't necessarily reflect the views of WHQR Radio, its editorial staff, or its members.

WHQR Commentary: "The Thirty Nine Steps"

Mar 29, 2016

Revisiting an old spy novel, Commentator Gwenyfar Rohler asks, can the lone wolf ever really act alone?


The subject of this week's commentary is small enough to fit in the palm of your hand. Shane Fernando takes a closer look at the Ukrainian Easter Egg.


'Tis the season to cast your ballot. This week, Commentator Philip Gerard honors his father, who believed that voting was essential for the health of our democracy.

Melissa Stone

This week, commentator Nan Graham takes a look at words derived from history's colorful characters.

Nan Graham has been a WHQR commentator for over 20 years. At this time, no words derive from her name.

WHQR Commentaries don't necessarily reflect the views of WHQR Radio, its editorial staff, or its members.

Care to sample some cannabis-infused honey? How about a stay at a Bud-and-Breakfast? This week, commentator Annie Gray Johnston explores our country's changing relationship with marijuana.

Wikipedia.com

What happens when we discover one of our favorite works of art was created by someone that makes our skin crawl? Commentator Gwenyfar Rohler has this answer.


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