climate change

The North Carolina Chapter of the US Green Building Council is holding its signature social event on Thursday, May 12 at Bluewater Waterfront Grill in Wrightsville Beach: Climate Change, Sea Level Rise, & Resilient Design.  The buffet dinner, beginning at 6:00 pm,  features a stude

Open Blue

The United Nations Climate Change Summit is underway in Paris, and for the first time in years, world leaders are hopeful a global agreement is possible.  Without organized cooperation, NASA scientists say the Earth will see an escalation of catastrophic weather events – such as longer and more intense heat waves, more severe storms, flooding, sea level rise… the list goes on – impacting everything from human health to food production. 

This broadcast of CoastLine originally aired on August 6, 2014.

What does sea level rise, now widely-accepted by the scientific community, mean for coastal areas in North Carolina?  How concerned do we really need to be?   

Global warming is not always accepted as a foregone scientific conclusion.  It still sparks political debate in some circles. 

The Coastal Resources Commission is taking a more cautious approach with regards to documenting sea level rise.  The group’s science panel became a lightning rod when it was suggested it didn’t consider differing viewpoints on climate change – an assertion the board disputes.  Legislation was introduced that required them to come out with another assessment in 2016 that says all available data must be considered.  Commission chairman Bob Emory says that’s fine and that’s what they were doing anyway.