Cinematique

Cinematique of Wilmington Film Series

Contact the Thalian Hall Box Office for Ticket Information:
Thalian Box Office: (910) 632-2285
310 Chestnut Street
Open Monday - Saturday, 2PM-6PM
Tickets are also available at the Thalian Hall Website.
Admission is $7 (+ tax and $1 ticketing fee)

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Listener Nancy wrote:

Some may say it's an overused standby, but thank you so much … for playing Carmina Burana on Wednesday! I will never grow tired of it and always turn up the volume real high listening at home or in the car. There's a past NPR story in which  Scott Simon talks about why so many artists have performed the piece. Were the words really written by monks?

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Listener Juanita of Carolina Beach wrote:

I seldom listen to HQR because I detest ‘chatter radio’, i.e. Talk of the Nation and Diane Rehm. And when I accidentally catch A Smooth Landing I do NOT recognize this as my station. I really enjoy Wait Wait. That’s my 2 cents, for what it’s worth.

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Listener Paul wrote:

Please move the Diane Rehm show off of WHQR or to a late night time slot. My afternoon commute is ruined now that I have to choose between right-wing propaganda and the left-wing Rehm.

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Susan Smith Sims wrote:

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Listener Paul from Oak Island is not a fan of Diane Rehm. He tweeted:

...sure do wish [Science Friday] was still 2-4pm! . . . thank goodness for podcasts!

And we had a similar message from Ron Cohen, but he prefers that her show

...should be dropped and music substituted. Less irrelevant and purposeless ventilation and more life-affirming music.

Listener Bob wrote what he called his “humble opinions”:

Formula 1

Oct 28, 2011

Looking toward next week's Cinematique showing of Senna at Thalian Hall, I'm taken back to the craziness of my teenage fascination with driving fast in fast machines. But unlike other Southern  boys I was enthralled by sports cars and European Formula One racing rather than dragsters and stock cars. My heroes were Jim Clark, Graham Hill, Emerson Fittipaldi, and Jackie Stewart. My first car was a 1957 Triumph TR-3 that I found under a tarp in a neighbor's garage.  Over the years, my admiration for the athleticism, intuition and intelligence of the great drivers has never waned.

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