Aging in Place Downtown

Chalmers Butterfield

Health disparities between white America and racial and ethnic minorities are well-documented.  The American Psychological Association says those disparities continue into the senior years – with minorities less likely to get medical help – and more likely to face chronic diseases such as obesity and diabetes.   But race isn’t the only determining factor for seniors who struggle with access to adequate health care.

Kaiser Family Foundation

In the United States, 14.5 % of the population is 65 or older.  That’s according to the most recent census.  In North Carolina, the number of elderly people is a fraction of a percentage higher at 14.7%.  In New Hanover County, nearly 16% of residents are 65 or over.  And that number shoots to almost a third of the population in neighboring Brunswick County.

According to the American Psychological Association, the number of Americans over age 85 is increasing faster than any other group. Since 1900, the proportion of Americans age 65 and older has more than tripled.

Business Brief: Aging in Place Downtown

Apr 22, 2013

Most people do not dream of moving into a nursing home. But it’s a reality for half of the population, and the costs can be enormous. In this edition of Business Brief, WHQR’s Sara Wood talks to Susan Silver, the director of Aging in Place Downtown. She’s in the process of gathering resources and momentum for the non-profit. It aims to help Wilmington’s elderly population age in place, in their homes. To begin, Silver is focusing on downtown.

For more information on Aging in Place Downtown, you can send an email to: aginginplacedowntown@hotmail.com.