Weekend Edition from NPR

Sat-Sun 8AM – 10AM
Scott Simon (SAT), Audie Cornish (SUN)
Scott Simon

Weekend counterpart to NPR's Morning Edition. Offers a mix of analysis and features on a wide range of topics, including arts, sports, entertainment, and human interest stories.

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Sunday Puzzle
12:03 am
Sun September 23, 2012

Finding Consecutively Good TV Shows

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Sat October 6, 2012 10:46 pm

On-air challenge: Every answer is the name of a TV show, past or present. Each can be found in consecutive letters in the sentences read. Name the TV shows. For example, in the sentence, "We watched the acrobat many times," the hidden TV show is BATMAN. Hint: Each answer has at least six letters.

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Middle East
8:00 pm
Sat September 22, 2012

Gaza's Future Looks Bleaker Even Than Its Past

A Palestinian family rides on a donkey cart along a waste dump in Al-Nusirat, central Gaza Strip, in February. Living conditions continue to deteriorate for the 1.8 million Palestinians who reside in Gaza.
Ali Ali EPA/Landov

Originally published on Thu October 4, 2012 11:43 am

Ihab Abu Nada's family lives down a series of dark narrow alleyways in Gaza City. The house has two bedrooms for the seven people living there — the kitchen and the bathroom are in the same space, and the roof is made of tin and frequently leaks.

Still, most of the Palestinian family's income goes into paying the rent.

Ihab's picture adorns a cracked wall; it's a simple memorial. Earlier this month, after being unable to find work, the 18-year-old set himself on fire and died. The family is still in mourning.

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The Two-Way
8:16 am
Sun September 16, 2012

Four U.S. Troops Killed In Afghanistan; NATO Strike Kills 8 Afghan Women

Originally published on Mon September 17, 2012 6:56 am

Four U.S. service members were killed by an Afghan police officer and a NATO airstrike killed eight women in separate attacks in Afghanistan on Sunday.

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Sports
7:56 am
Sun September 16, 2012

Reading The Baseball Tea Leaves

Originally published on Sun September 16, 2012 8:36 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

It's time to talk sports.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "LIFE IS A BALL GAME")

SISTER WINONA CARR: Life is a ball game being played each day. Life is a ball game...

WERTHEIMER: It's mid-September and for fans of Major League Baseball that means only a couple of weeks are left before playoffs get underway.

But before the games begin, NPR's Mike Pesca has been stacking up the baseball stats and he's here to share his findings. Hi, Mike.

MIKE PESCA, BYLINE: They're about to topple over just now.

(LAUGHTER)

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Middle East
7:56 am
Sun September 16, 2012

In Wake Of Violence, Pope Addresses Middle East

Pope Benedict XVI waves to Lebanese faithful upon his arrival to hold a mass on the waterfront in downtown Beirut on Sunday.
Hussein Malla AP

Originally published on Sun September 16, 2012 8:52 am

Pope Benedict XVI said Mass in Lebanon Sunday during his first visit to the Middle East, which is seeing dwindling Christian numbers and where Christians fear Islamists will gain power now that secular dictators have fallen.

Lebanon has the region's second-largest Christian population, after Egypt. The pope spent his three-day visit promoting peace and religious tolerance.

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Asia
7:56 am
Sun September 16, 2012

Chinese Flood Streets In Anti-Japan Demonstrations

Protester Mu Peidong carries a homemade sign that reads: "Even if we have to kill all Japanese, we must recover the Diaoyu islands."
Louisa Lim NPR

Originally published on Sun September 16, 2012 10:48 am

It's been a weekend of huge anti-Japanese protests in as many as 85 cities across China, according to the Kyodo news agency.

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History
7:56 am
Sun September 16, 2012

Reenacting Antietam: Fighting As Family Once Did

Originally published on Sun September 16, 2012 8:36 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Tomorrow marks the 150th anniversary of the Civil War's Battle of Antietam, one of the bloodiest days of any war. In honor of the sesquicentennial, the battle site is hosting a slew of events commemorating the fight. Reporter Jacob Fenston went to Sharpsburg, Maryland, the site of the battle, and brings us this report.

JACOB FENSTON, BYLINE: It started just before dawn.

(SOUNDBITE OF BUGLE PLAYING)

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Around the Nation
7:56 am
Sun September 16, 2012

Homestead Act Sewed Its Way Into U.S. Fabric

Originally published on Sun September 16, 2012 8:36 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Of course, the Homestead Act was born during troubled times in American history. It passed during the Civil War, but just barely. And it came at the expense of Native Americans, who were displaced from lands they have settled for generation. We spoke to Jonathan Earle, an associate professor of history at the University of Kansas, and asked him why the Homestead Act was so difficult to pass.

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Politics
7:56 am
Sun September 16, 2012

What To Watch For In Race For Hispanic Vote

Originally published on Sun September 16, 2012 8:36 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Linda Wertheimer.

With about 50 days to go before Election Day, both parties are focusing on what will lead them to victory in both the battle for the White House, as well as control in Congress. What everyone seems to agree upon is that the Latino vote will be crucial. Between 2000 and 2010, the Hispanic population in the U.S. increased by some 43 percent. Latino voters can mean the difference in several states.

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Around the Nation
6:41 am
Sun September 16, 2012

Still Home Sweet Home More Than A Century Later

Lee and Shirley Wohler in the kitchen of their farmhouse south of Waterville, Kan.
Becky Sullivan NPR

Originally published on Sun September 16, 2012 8:36 am

This year, the Homestead Act of 1862 turned 150. That landmark piece of legislation opened up the Western territories to settlement. Almost anybody could receive up to 160 acres for free if they built a house and "improved" the land over the course of five years. Millions took part, and eventually, more than 10 percent of all U.S. land was given away.

A German peasant named Frederick Wohler was one of those early homesteaders. Wohler received the deed to 80 acres of farmland in north-central Kansas 138 years ago this weekend. And today, the Wohlers are still there.

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