Weekend Edition from NPR

Sat-Sun 8AM – 10AM
Scott Simon (SAT), Audie Cornish (SUN)
Scott Simon

Weekend counterpart to NPR's Morning Edition. Offers a mix of analysis and features on a wide range of topics, including arts, sports, entertainment, and human interest stories.

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Sunday Puzzle
1:59 am
Sun October 21, 2012

'Poked' And 'Tummy' Become 'Poker' And 'Rummy'

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 8:03 am

On-air challenge: You will be given two words. Change one letter in each of them to make two new words that name things that are in the same category. (Hint: In each pair, the letter that you change to — that is, the new letter — is the same in each pair.) For example, given the words "poked" and "tummy," the answer would be "poker" and "rummy."

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NPR Story
2:14 pm
Sun October 14, 2012

Sen. Arlen Specter, A Moderate Voice For 30 Years, Dies

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, BYLINE: This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin.

Longtime Republican Senator Arlen Specter has died. The GOP firebrand made headlines in 2009 when he switched parties. Before leaving the Republican Party and becoming a Democrat, he had a reputation for speaking out against some of his own party's positions.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED TAPE)

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Author Interviews
2:14 pm
Sun October 14, 2012

Word Wars And The 'Story Of Ain't'

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

In 1961, dictionary publishers G & C Merriam published a revised edition of "Webster's New International Dictionary" which, since it's printing in 1934, was considered the standard bearer of American English. "Webster's Third New International Dictionary" was a thoroughly modern tome. It added thousands of new words, updated usage suggestions, and was meant to capture language on the cutting edge of American culture. Instead, it sent scholars and wordsmiths into a frenzy.

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Theater
2:14 pm
Sun October 14, 2012

'Beat Generation,' Kerouac's Lost Play, Hits Stage

The cast rehearses a scene from Jack Kerouac's only play, The Beat Generation.
Courtesy of the Merrimack Repertory Theater

Originally published on Sat October 20, 2012 3:55 pm

Jack Kerouac shot to fame after his jazz- and drug-infused book, On the Road, hit stores in 1957. During that hot period the autobiographical novelist also wrote his only play, The Beat Generation.

The play was never produced and all but forgotten. The lost work, however, was rediscovered in 2004 and is now set to premiere in the writer's hometown of Lowell, Mass.

Charles Towers, artistic director at the Merrimack Repertory Theater, remembers exactly what he thought after Kerouac's lost play was uncovered.

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Poetry
2:14 pm
Sun October 14, 2012

'A Thousand Mornings' With Poet Mary Oliver

Mary Oliver has won a Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award.
Rachel Giese Brown

Mary Oliver is a Pulitzer Prize-winning poet whose body of work is largely filled with imagery of the natural world — cats, opossums crossing the street, sunflowers and black oaks in the sunshine. Her most recent collection is entitled A Thousand Mornings.

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Sports
10:00 am
Sun October 14, 2012

Week In Sports: Big Surprises In Baseball Playoffs

Originally published on Sun October 14, 2012 2:14 pm

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "LIFE IS A BALL GAME")

SISTER WINONA CARR: Life is a ball game being played each day. Life is a ball game...

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Baseball playoffs moved into the league championships last night and the New York Yankees suffered a 6-4 loss. Yankees captain Derek Jeter suffered a broken ankle. NPR's Mike Pesca hasn't missed a minute of the postseason drama. He joins us now. Hey, Mike.

MIKE PESCA, BYLINE: There have been a lot of games. I think I'll cop to missing a couple of minutes but yeah, yeah.

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Theater
6:45 am
Sun October 14, 2012

Hard Life Of Pullman Porters Gets Stage Debut

Originally published on Sun October 14, 2012 2:14 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

For most of the 20th century, if you wanted to travel in style you were traveling on trains. If you really wanted to do it up right, you shelled out big money for a private berth in something called a Pullman car. Thousands of African-American men found steady work as Pullman porters, but they also faced low wages, terrible working conditions and racism.

Seattle-based playwright Cheryl West tells their story in "Pullman Porter Blues." It's a musical drama premiering at the Seattle Repertory Theatre.

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Economy
6:45 am
Sun October 14, 2012

What Recent Gains Mean For U.S. Economy

Originally published on Sun October 14, 2012 2:14 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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History
6:45 am
Sun October 14, 2012

Lessons From The Cuban Missile Crisis

Originally published on Sun October 14, 2012 2:14 pm

Fifty years ago, a United States Air Force U-2 spyplane captured photographic proof that the Soviet Union was installing offensive nuclear missile sites in Cuba, and a diplomatic standoff ensued. Weekend Edition host Rachel Martin talks with Graham Allison, director of the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs and professor at Harvard's John F. Kennedy School of Government about the lessons learned from the Cuban Missile Crisis.

Science
6:45 am
Sun October 14, 2012

A Human-Powered Helicopter: Straight Up Difficult

Kyle Glusenkamp pilots Gamera, a human-powered helicopter.
Maggie Starbard NPR

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 10:00 am

"I grew up wanting to fly," says Graham Bowen-Davies. "I guess I just settled for being an engineer."

He's standing on an indoor track in southern Maryland, watching a giant helicopter take flight. At the end of each of its four spindly arms — arms he helped design and build — a giant rotor churns the air. In the cockpit sits the engine: a 0.7-horsepower, 135-pound graduate student named Kyle Gluesenkamp.

Gluesenkamp is pedaling like crazy to keep the rotors spinning and the craft aloft.

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