Weekend Edition from NPR

Sat-Sun 8AM – 10AM
Scott Simon (SAT), Audie Cornish (SUN)
Scott Simon

Weekend counterpart to NPR's Morning Edition. Offers a mix of analysis and features on a wide range of topics, including arts, sports, entertainment, and human interest stories.

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Sunday Puzzle
4:32 am
Sun October 14, 2012

Where, 'O' Where Shall I Put You?

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Sun October 14, 2012 2:14 pm

On-air challenge: Every answer is a two-word phrase in which the letter "O" is added at the end of the first word to make the second word. For example, given the clue "pack animal owned by Thomas Jefferson's first vice president," the answer would be "Burr burro."

Last week's challenge: Draw a regular hexagon and connect every pair of vertices except one. The pair you don't connect are not on opposite sides of the hexagon but along a shorter diagonal. How many triangles of any size are in this figure?

Answer: 82 triangles

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Alt.Latino
2:03 am
Sun October 14, 2012

What Two Songs Say About Argentine History

Argentine band Tremor adds a new twist to a traditional dance music known as malambo.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 2:19 pm

A country's music can reveal a lot about its history. This week, Alt.Latino hosts Jasmine Garsd and Felix Contreras stop by Weekend Edition Sunday to offer two examples from Argentina.

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NPR Story
11:24 am
Sun October 7, 2012

The Barcode: Through Thick And Thin For 60 Years

Originally published on Tue October 9, 2012 1:24 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Today marks an important anniversary. On October 7, 1952, 60 years ago, the patent for the bar code was filed. For younger listeners, it's perhaps hard to imagine that there was actually a time when everything you bought wasn't scanable. Today, of course, those vertical zebra stripes are ubiquitous, on everything - from air fresheners to zombie survival kits.

According to the BBC, the very first item ever scanned by its barcode was a pack of chewing gum in an Ohio supermarket in 1974.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

National Security
7:55 am
Sun October 7, 2012

After Years-Long Battles, Terrorism Suspects In U.S.

Originally published on Tue October 9, 2012 1:24 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. Prosecutors are calling it a milestone for the U.S. justice system. A radical Islamic cleric and four other of America's most wanted terrorism suspects have finally appeared in courts in New York and Connecticut. Authorities had fought for years to extradite the men from the United Kingdom. NPR's Carrie Johnson reports.

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Around the Nation
7:55 am
Sun October 7, 2012

Pinball Wizards At Home In Colo. Mountain Town

Originally published on Tue October 9, 2012 1:24 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

When was the last time you heard this sound:

(SOUNDBITE OF PINBALL MACHINE)

MARTIN: Pinball machines are as popular as ever in a small mountain town in Colorado, giving a new generation a taste of the past. NPR's Ahmad Shafi has the story.

(SOUNDBITE OF PINBALL MACHINE)

AHMAD SHAFI, BYLINE: Lyons, Colorado sits in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains, about 20 miles north of Boulder. It's known for its annual music festivals and art scene. But in downtown Lyons, there's a business that doesn't fit that mold.

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Economy
7:55 am
Sun October 7, 2012

As Fiscal Cliff Nears, Simpson-Bowles Re-Emerges

Originally published on Tue October 9, 2012 1:24 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. Simpson, Bowles - the names flew by eight times, without explanation, during Wednesday's presidential debate. Google reported that Simpson-Bowles was among the most searched-for terms online that night. The reference was to Republican elder statesman Alan Simpson and his Democratic counterpart, Erskine Bowles. The two headed a 2010 commission on the national debt.

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Around the Nation
7:55 am
Sun October 7, 2012

Thousands Hold Fast To Tradition Of Oral Storytelling

Originally published on Tue October 9, 2012 1:24 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Before Twitter, radio, even electricity - in fact, going all the way back to pre-historic times, people gathered around fires to listen to stories. Even though the glow of computers has replaced the warmth of the campfire for most of us, some folks still hold fast to the tradition of oral storytelling.

As Missy Shelton reports, nearly 10,000 people have gathered this weekend for the National Storytelling Festival in northeast Tennessee to hear professional tellers weave some good yarns.

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The Picture Show
6:15 am
Sun October 7, 2012

Catching The 'Shadow' Of A Lost World

Wedding party, 1914. A still from the film In the Land of the Head Hunters, in which Curtis sought to re-create a mythic story of the Kwakiutl.
Edward Curtis Library of Congress

Originally published on Tue October 9, 2012 1:24 pm

Photographer Edward Curtis started off his career at the tail end of the 19th century, making portraits of Seattle's wealthiest citizens. But a preoccupation with Native Americans and a chance encounter on a mountaintop triggered an idea: Curtis decided to chronicle the experience of the vanishing tribes — all of them. It was an unbelievably ambitious project that would define Curtis, his work and his legacy.

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Television
6:11 am
Sun October 7, 2012

TV's Britton Fights To Stay In Nashville's Lights

Country singer Rayna James (Connie Britton) has got a big voice, big hair and big problems in Nashville on ABC.
Katherine Bomboy-Thornton ABC

Originally published on Tue October 9, 2012 1:24 pm

If you're a country music fan, the name Rayna Jaymes may not ring a bell. That's because Rayna Jaymes is a fictional character played by actress Connie Britton. Britton stars in the new TV series Nashville, which premieres this Wednesday on ABC.

TV fans will know Britton for her Emmy-nominated roles in American Horror Story and Friday Nights Lights, in which she played Tami Taylor, the wife of a high school football coach in a small Texas town.

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Author Interviews
6:11 am
Sun October 7, 2012

'Wooden Floors' Pack Hidden Thrill In Author's Debut

Wooden floor and chair
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue October 9, 2012 1:24 pm

Housesitting is a delicate chore. It involves inhabiting someone else's home — their personal space, watching over their stuff — and sticking to the Boy Scouts' creed to leave no trace. That's pretty much the opposite of what happens in Will Wiles' debut novel, Care of Wooden Floors. It's the story of an already strained friendship pushed to the breaking point by a housesitting favor gone terribly, terribly wrong.

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