Weekend Edition from NPR

Sat-Sun 8AM – 10AM
Scott Simon (SAT), Audie Cornish (SUN)
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Weekend counterpart to NPR's Morning Edition. Offers a mix of analysis and features on a wide range of topics, including arts, sports, entertainment, and human interest stories.

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NPR Story
7:56 am
Sun January 13, 2013

At A Young Age, Aaron Swartz Did A Lifetime Of Work

Originally published on Mon January 14, 2013 8:51 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

There was sadness and shock among many in the tech community yesterday after news spread of the suicide of a computer protegee. Twenty-six-year-old Aaron Swartz became a tech celebrity at the age of 14. Friends and family say he battled depression and was recently anxious because he was about to go on trial in federal court. NPR's Laura Sydell reports.

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NPR Story
7:56 am
Sun January 13, 2013

Baseball Writers Navigate Muddled Ethics

Originally published on Sun January 13, 2013 10:30 am

Host Rachel Martin talks with NPR's Mike Pesca about baseball's Hall of Fame shutout. This year, the Baseball Writers' Association of America did not select a player for the game's highest honor.

NPR Story
7:56 am
Sun January 13, 2013

In Kabul, Opinions On Drawdown As Numerous As People

Originally published on Sun January 13, 2013 10:30 am

President Hamid Karzai concluded a visit to the U.S. last week with a meeting and news conference with President Obama, where they announced an accelerated troop withdrawal. In Kabul, the reaction varies. Even though most people in the city seem more focused on shoveling out from the latest snowstorm, some are watching the news.

Music News
6:10 am
Sun January 13, 2013

A Married Duo Chases The Dream, Toddlers In Tow

Stefanie Drootin-Senseny and Chris Senseny are the core of Big Harp, a band the married couple formed shortly after the birth of their second child.
Ryan Fox Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun January 13, 2013 2:37 pm

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It's All Politics
6:09 am
Sun January 13, 2013

Cabinet Picks Come As Democrats Push To Change Filibuster

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., left, and Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., have talked about a deal to change the Senate's filibuster rules.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Sun January 13, 2013 2:25 pm

In recent weeks, President Obama has chosen Sen. John Kerry, D-Mass., as his next secretary of state; former Sen. Chuck Hagel, R-Neb., to head the Pentagon; counterterrorism adviser John Brennan to be CIA director; and his chief of staff, Jack Lew, to be the next Treasury secretary.

Each nomination will have to be confirmed by the U.S. Senate, and they all could be stopped by a Senate filibuster — that is, the refusal by any one of 100 senators to let a matter come to a final vote.

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Books
5:58 am
Sun January 13, 2013

Life Is Difficult But Rewarding Under This 'Umbrella'

Will Self is a British author and journalist. His latest book, Umbrella, was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize.
Polly Borland

Originally published on Sun January 13, 2013 10:30 am

What is the best way for a writer to reflect life? For most of us, it's probably the traditional novel that has sat on our nightstands the most: the sprawling, linear tale, told from birth to death. For Will Self, the most lifelike story is told inside out, from the minds of the characters, without a narrator, a filter or any explanations along the way.

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Author Interviews
5:55 am
Sun January 13, 2013

Deserts, Coal Walking And Wildfires: Can You Take The 'Heat'?

To understand heat, biologist Bill Streever simmered in some of the hottest places on Earth, including California's Death Valley.
Gabriel Bouys AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun January 13, 2013 10:30 am

Scientist and writer Bill Streever is fascinated by the extremes at both ends of the thermometer. In his 2009 book, Cold, he visited some of the chilliest places on Earth. And in his latest book, he treks through Death Valley, investigates fire-based weaponry and walks on coals — all to gain insight into what it means to be hot. Really hot.

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U.S.
5:54 am
Sun January 13, 2013

Army Corps' Options Dwindle Along With Mississippi River

An excavator perched on a barge removes rocks from the Mississippi River in Thebes Ill.
Seth Perlman AP

Originally published on Sun January 13, 2013 6:16 pm

Every day this month, the Army Corps of Engineers is working hard to deepen the Mississippi River's shipping channel in an effort to keep navigation open between St. Louis and Cairo, Ill.

Water levels are forecast to remain high enough through January to float loaded barges, but some say the only way to keep the river open next month will be to release water from the Missouri River.

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Music News
2:03 am
Sun January 13, 2013

Naxos: The Little Record Label That Could (And Did)

Over a quarter century, Naxos Records has evolved from an industry joke to a leading force in classical music.
Naxos

Originally published on Mon January 14, 2013 12:22 pm

This past year was a good one for Naxos Records. In fact, it's been a great quarter century for the company, which has grown from a budget-label punch line to a leading force in classical music recording.

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Sunday Puzzle
12:03 am
Sun January 13, 2013

Two Is Company, Three Is A Crowd

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Sun January 13, 2013 2:22 pm

On-air challenge: Given three three-letter words, give a three-letter word that can follow each to complete a familiar six-letter word. None of the words in a set will be related in meaning. For example, given "dam," "man" and "sew," the answer would be "age," which results in "damage," "manage" and "sewage."

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