Weekend Edition from NPR

Sat-Sun 8AM – 10AM
Scott Simon (SAT), Audie Cornish (SUN)
Scott Simon

Weekend counterpart to NPR's Morning Edition. Offers a mix of analysis and features on a wide range of topics, including arts, sports, entertainment, and human interest stories.

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Movies
8:00 am
Sun January 22, 2012

Checking In On The Sundance Film Festival

Host Rachel Martin speaks with entertainment reporter Stacey Wilson about this year's Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah.

Books
6:33 am
Sun January 22, 2012

'Cultural Revolution Cookbook': A Taste Of Humanity

Braised Pork In Soy
Melisa Goh NPR

From about 1966 to 1976, China's leader Mao Zedong enforced a brutal agenda. Everything was rationed during the Cultural Revolution. Millions of people were forced out of the cities and into the countryside, where food was even scarcer. The government controlled people's movements, their livelihoods, even their thoughts.

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Latin America
6:33 am
Sun January 22, 2012

Church Broadcasts Hope; Haitians Flock Post-Quake

Pastor Junior Antoine on stage at Shalom Tabernacle of Glory evangelical church, in front of a congregation that grew rapidly after the earthquake two years ago.
Jason Beaubien NPR

Originally published on Wed January 25, 2012 9:24 am

On Jan. 12, for the second anniversary of the devastating earthquake, thousands of people flocked to the Shalom Church in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. The "church" is just a plywood stage under a patchwork of tattered tarps.

The crowd was so large that it spilled down a muddy hill toward a tent camp for earthquake victims. Most of the singing, swaying congregation were so far away they couldn't even see the podium.

The evangelical mission now claims to have more than 50,000 members and one of the most popular radio stations in Haiti.

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Africa
6:31 am
Sun January 22, 2012

In Morocco, Islamists Learn To Work With A King

Morocco's Islamist Justice and Development Party heads the country's new government, the result of snap elections called by the king. Here, Abdelilah Benkirane, the party's secretary general and now prime minister, arrives for an election rally in Sale on Nov. 1. The party now faces political as well as economic challenges.
Paul Schemm AP

An Islamist party heads Morocco's newly elected government, part of a wave of Islamist election victories following uprisings across North Africa.

But Morocco's case is a bit different. King Mohammed VI responded quickly to a pro-democracy movement last year with a new constitution and snap elections. The Justice and Development Party, known as the PJD, won the most votes in November. Now, Moroccans ask: How will this popular Islamist party govern?

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Sunday Puzzle
12:01 am
Sun January 22, 2012

Sitting Comfortably In Between

NPR Graphic

On-Air Challenge: You'll be given two things in the same category. You name the only other thing in the same category that fits between the given things alphabetically. For example, given "Mars" and "Saturn," the answer would be "Mercury."

Last Week's Challenge: Will Shortz celebrates the 25th anniversary of Weekend Edition Sunday and the Sunday Puzzle with three mystery guests.

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From Our Listeners
8:00 am
Sun January 15, 2012

Your Letters: Teaching Soldiers To Be 'Army Strong'

Last week we aired a segment about the U.S. Army's Comprehensive Soldier Fitness program which aims to teach soldiers how to be emotionally and psychologically strong. Host Rachel Martin reads letters about that story and more.

Author Interviews
8:00 am
Sun January 15, 2012

Post-9/11 Life As A 'Non-Enemy Combatant'

Alex Gilvarry's dark first novel occupies a wacky continuum that begins at the center of haute couture, and ends in solitary confinement. The book is From the Memoirs of a Non-Enemy Combatant and it looks at one man's trip into military detention. Host Rachel Martin talks with Gilvarry about his book.

Author Interviews
5:58 am
Sun January 15, 2012

'In Our Prime'? What It Means To Be Middle-Aged

iStockphoto.com

Not so long ago, being middle-aged was associated with being over the hill. But not anymore — nowadays, 60 is the new 40. In her new book, In Our Prime, Patricia Cohen, a culture reporter for The New York Times (who isn't shy about telling us she's 51), explores the evolution of that oft-maligned, middle period of life.

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Sunday Puzzle
12:01 am
Sun January 15, 2012

Second To Last

NPR Graphic

On-Air Challenge: Think of a word that can follow a given word to complete a familiar two-word phrase or name. The first two letters of your word must be the second and last letters, respectively, of the given word. For example, if given "fallen," the answer would be "angel."

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Music Interviews
3:00 pm
Sat January 14, 2012

Charlie Haden: A Moment Of Clarity

Charlie Haden's latest album is Come Sunday, a collaboration with the late pianist Hank Jones.
Courtesy of the artist

Charlie Haden is a legend in jazz music. He started as a singer on his family's country radio show when he was just 2 years old. After losing his voice to polio as a teenager, he found a new voice by picking up the bass. That decision launched a career that spans jazz, country and gospel music.

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