Talk of the Nation from NPR

Mon-Thurs 2PM-3PM
Neal Conan

Talk of the Nation offers call-in listeners the opportunity to join enlightening discussions with decision-makers, authors, academicians, and artists from around the world.

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From Our Listeners
1:00 pm
Tue October 25, 2011

Letters: Occupy Wall Street, Irrational Fears

Transcript

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Your Money
1:00 pm
Tue October 25, 2011

Quitting Your Bank: Easier Said Than Done?

Originally published on Tue October 25, 2011 3:30 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, host: Maybe it's new fees. The Bank of America recently decided to charge $5 a month to use a debit card or maybe it's just the size of the institution you bank with. If you decide to change for whatever reason, well, it may not be so easy. If you've tried to break up with your bank or have questions about doing that, give us a call, 800-989-8255. Email us, talk@npr.org. You can also join the conversation on our website. That's at npr.org. Click on TALK OF THE NATION.

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Education
1:00 pm
Tue October 25, 2011

Are Single-Sex Classrooms Better For Kids?

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, host: This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. The long-running debate on single-sex education erupted again last month when a report in the journal, Science, concluded that there's simply no empirical evidence that segregating boys and girls improves education, but that it can perpetuate sexist stereotypes and hinder social development, none of which convinced advocates on the other side.

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NPR Story
2:17 pm
Mon October 24, 2011

Guillermo Del Toro's 'Eternal' Monster Obsession

Guillermo del Toro's Pan's Labyrinth won three Oscars, for Art Direction, Cinematography and Makeup.

Karolina Webb

Few have as intense a relationship with monsters as filmmaker Guillermo del Toro.

His award-winning film, Pan's Labyrinth, depicted monsters both fantastical and human, and his best-selling The Strain novels re-imagine vampires as anything but romantic.

The Night Eternal is the trilogy's final book. Del Toro talks with NPR's Neal Conan about his monster-filled career on film and on the page.

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NPR Story
1:00 pm
Mon October 24, 2011

Iraq Withdrawal: About Time, Or Looming Disaster?

President Obama has said all U.S. troops will come home by year's end. Critics call the move a disaster, arguing Iraq is still far from stable, and move will leave the country vulnerable to sectarian violence and to influence from Iran. Others insist the announcement is long overdue.

NPR Story
1:00 pm
Mon October 24, 2011

Op-Ed: 'Ugly' Safety Measures Kill Public Spaces

In cities like New York and Washington, D.C., Julia Vitullo-Martin complains, law enforcement and city planners have installed jersey barriers, concrete planters and other "ugly measures that evoke fear rather than safety." In her op-ed for USA Today she calls it "militarized urbanism."

Energy
1:00 pm
Fri October 21, 2011

Reinventing Fire: Getting Beyond Fossil Fuels

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, host: This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm Ira Flatow. Imagine you no longer have monthly utility bills. All that money you use to spend on gas and electricity, still in the bank. Instead you get a check every month for making electricity using your solar shingles on your roof and pumping that surplus electricity back into the grid.

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History
1:00 pm
Fri October 21, 2011

Science Diction: The Origin Of 'Bunsen Burner'

Every high school chemist has no doubt fiddled with a Bunsen burner--but where did the apparatus get its name? Science historian Howard Markel talks about the German chemist Robert Bunsen, and why his experiments necessitated the invention of the gas burner still in use today.

Space
1:00 pm
Fri October 21, 2011

Predicting When Space Junk Will Come Home To Earth

This weekend, a defunct German satellite is scheduled to crash to Earth, just a month after a NASA satellite did the same. NASA orbital debris scientist Mark Matney and Phil Plait, author of the Bad Astronomy blog, discuss whether engineers on Earth have any say when--or where--objects fall.

Space
1:00 pm
Fri October 21, 2011

Did Giant Stars Feed Blue Stragglers?

In a letter to the journal Nature published this week, astronomers Aaron Geller and Robert Mathieu offer an explanation for the origin of blue straggler stars in a star cluster called NGC 188. Geller suggests the stars fed on neighbor stars, leaving behind white dwarfs.

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