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Mon-Fri 5AM – 9AM
Steve Inskeep and Renée Montagne
Bob Workmon

Produced by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based in 13 countries around the world, and producers and reporters in 19 locations in the U.S. Their reporting is supplemented by NPR member station reporters across the country and a strong corps of independent producers and reporters in the public radio system.

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NPR Story
4:00 am
Fri November 11, 2011

Clint Eastwood Takes On FBI Legend 'J. Edgar'

Originally published on Fri November 11, 2011 6:08 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And let's talk now about a man who served his country out of uniform for generations. J. Edgar Hoover created the Federal Bureau of Investigation as we know it today. In his lifetime, he built up an image as a hero. His career went from the end of World War I to the 1970s. Since death in 1972, many have reevaluated Hoover as a menace. Now, Hoover is the subject of a movie in which he is played by Leonardo DiCaprio, in a film directed by Clint Eastwood. Kenneth Turan has a review.

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Business
4:00 am
Fri November 11, 2011

The Last Word In Business

The American Farm Bureau Federation has released its 26th annual price survey on the cost of the classic Thanksgiving dinner. That includes the turkey, sweet potatoes, cranberries and pumpkin pie. This year, the average cost for a feast for 10 people is $49.20. That's up almost $6 from last year.

Around the Nation
4:00 am
Fri November 11, 2011

Penn State Trustees To Meet

Penn State University's Board of Trustees today holds an open board meeting. Earlier this week, the board fired head football coach Joe Paterno and President Graham Spanier. Two high-level administrators have been charged with failing to report alleged child sex abuse by a former coach.

StoryCorps
12:01 am
Fri November 11, 2011

Living To Tell The Horrible Tale Of Pearl Harbor

Battleships USS West Virginia and USS Tennessee after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, on Dec. 7, 1941.The attack initiated U.S. participation in World War II.
National Archives

Warning: Some of the content included here may be disturbing.

This year marks the 70th anniversary of the attacks on Pearl Harbor. Thousands of Americans were killed that day. But Frank Curre, who was just a teenager when he enlisted in the Navy, survived the onslaught.

"When I got out of high school, I went looking for a job. Couldn't find it, so I told Mama, 'I'm joining the Navy — and you've got to sign the papers, because I'm only 17.' I said, 'If you don't sign the papers for me, Mama, I'll go downtown and get a hobo to sign 'em.' "

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All Songs Considered Blog
12:01 am
Fri November 11, 2011

Listener Picks: Songs You Turn Up To 11

The Devil's 11's: Spinal Tap's Nigel Tufnel (a.k.a. Christopher Guest) in concert in 2009. If only he had three arms.
AFP Getty Images

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Around the Nation
7:54 am
Thu November 10, 2011

Christmas Tree Fee Causes Uproar

The Obama administration put off a plan to collect a fee on Christmas trees. An industry group asked for the fee, 15 cents per tree. Conservatives denounced what they labeled a tax on Christmas trees. The White House defended the fee, saying it's not a tax at all. All the same, the administration says it will delay collecting the money.

Around the Nation
7:47 am
Thu November 10, 2011

Did The Emergency Alert System Test Pass Muster?

Had Wednesday's first nationwide test of the Emergency Alert System been a real alert, some may have been left in the dark. Instead of that irritating tone interrupting television and radio programming, some TV viewers heard Lady Gaga singing "Paparazzi." Others had their programming switched to QVC, a home shopping channel.

Poisoned Places: Toxic Air, Neglected Communities
5:00 am
Thu November 10, 2011

EPA Regulations Give Kilns Permission To Pollute

The Ash Grove Cement Kiln, as seen from an aerial photograph, sits on the northern edge of Chanute, Kan.
David Gilkey NPR

Part three of a four-part series, Poisoned Places: Toxic Air, Neglected Communities.

The smokestack stands more than nine stories above the southeastern Kansas prairie and the small city of Chanute, and it's bright, white flashing lights are like a beacon in the night sky.

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Business
4:46 am
Thu November 10, 2011

The Last Word In Business

Renee Montgne has the Last Word in business.

NPR Story
4:00 am
Thu November 10, 2011

Business News

Steve Inskeep has business news.

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