Morning Edition from NPR

Mon-Fri 5AM – 9AM
Steve Inskeep and Renée Montagne
Bob Workmon

Produced by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based in 13 countries around the world, and producers and reporters in 19 locations in the U.S. Their reporting is supplemented by NPR member station reporters across the country and a strong corps of independent producers and reporters in the public radio system.

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NPR Story
4:58 am
Fri November 2, 2012

Romney Back On The Attack In Virginia

Originally published on Fri November 2, 2012 11:43 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

On a Friday - we've made it to Friday - it's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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The Two-Way
3:31 am
Fri November 2, 2012

U.S. Offers New Details Of Deadly Libya Attack

A Libyan military guard stands in front of one of the U.S. Consulate's burned out buildings on Sept. 14. The U.S. is offering new details of the attack on the consulate that killed four Americans, including Ambassador Chris Stevens.
Mohammad Hannon AP

Originally published on Fri November 2, 2012 11:43 am

Once a mob began attacking the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi, Libya, on the night of Sept. 11, officials in Washington, D.C., watched with alarm. Now, new details are emerging about their response to the deadly attack.

President Obama and his entire national security team monitored what was going on half a world away. Army Gen. Carter Ham, who was the regional commander for Africa, happened to be in Washington that day.

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Animals
8:00 pm
Thu November 1, 2012

Move Over, Parrot: Elephant Mimics Trainer At Zoo

Koshi, an elephant, makes sounds that imitate Korean words.
Stoeger, et. al. Current Biology

Originally published on Fri November 2, 2012 11:43 am

Scientists say an Asian elephant at a South Korean zoo can imitate human speech, saying five Korean words that are readily understood by people who speak the language.

The male elephant, named Koshik, invented an unusual method of sound production that involves putting his trunk in his mouth and manipulating his vocal tract.

"This is not the kind of sound that Asian elephants normally make, and it's a dead-on match of the speech of his trainers," says Tecumseh Fitch of the University of Vienna in Austria.

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Strange News
5:57 am
Thu November 1, 2012

Chain In U.K. Tries To Lift 'Coffee Confusion'

Originally published on Thu November 1, 2012 6:43 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. A coffee chain in Britain surveyed its customers and found 70 percent suffered coffee confusion. So the chain is now offering a new trial menu in plain English. A latte is now really, really milky coffee, a cappuccino - frothy coffee, and a mocha -chocolate flavored coffee. Not listed: a decaf soy triple tall latte, though some baristas might just call that - Why Bother. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Strange News
5:56 am
Thu November 1, 2012

This Could Happen To The Best Of Drivers

Originally published on Thu November 1, 2012 6:43 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. This could happen to the best of drivers. Suspected smugglers wanted to take their SUV across the U.S.-Mexico border. They built ramps that would take it over the Arizona border fence. But unlike the way it would've happened in old episodes of the "Dukes of Hazzard," the Jeep got stuck on top of the fence. The smugglers spent time trying to free it from the top of the fence, then fled back into Mexico when border patrol agents arrived. You are listening to MORNING EDITION.

Around the Nation
5:14 am
Thu November 1, 2012

The Little Girl Who's Had Enough Of Politics

Originally published on Thu November 1, 2012 6:41 am

Abigael Evans, 4, of Fort Collins, Colo., started crying on the way to the grocery store as she and her mother listened to NPR in the car. NPR editors issued an immediate apology online, and later in the afternoon, Abbie cheered up when she got an NPR Politics pin from member station KUNC.

Business
5:06 am
Thu November 1, 2012

Help Wanted In Switzerland: Hunting Tax Cheats

Originally published on Thu November 1, 2012 6:41 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And while we're on the subject of tax evasion, our last word in business today is: Help wanted.

Switzerland is looking for more staff to handle a flood of new requests from other countries that are looking for tax cheats.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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Around the Nation
5:06 am
Thu November 1, 2012

In North Jersey, Still A State Of Emergency

Originally published on Thu November 1, 2012 6:41 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

On the first of November, it's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

Portions of the New York subway system are up and running again after being shut down for three days after Superstorm Sandy. There is, of course, a giant hole in the middle of the system. The lines stop short of Lower Manhattan, where many tunnels and stations flooded.

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U.S.
8:28 am
Wed October 31, 2012

Assessing The Damage From Superstorm Sandy

Originally published on Wed October 31, 2012 8:52 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning.

We'll talk next with the man coordinating the federal response to Hurricane Sandy. Craig Fugate is head of the Federal Emergency Management Agency. He's at FEMA headquarters in Washington.

Mr. Fugate, welcome to the program.

CRAIG FUGATE: Hi, good morning.

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Around the Nation
6:47 am
Wed October 31, 2012

Stranded In Hawaii By Sandy, Travelers Wait

Originally published on Wed October 31, 2012 8:52 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. Hurricane Sandy disrupted flights all across the United States. Even people far from the storm discovered planes could not get to their airports. And of all the people affected, the saddest were surely 1,300 people from the East Coast stuck in Honolulu.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

What a shame.

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