Morning Edition from NPR

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Produced by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based in 13 countries around the world, and producers and reporters in 19 locations in the U.S. Their reporting is supplemented by NPR member station reporters across the country and a strong corps of independent producers and reporters in the public radio system.

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Europe Reacts To Gadhafi's Death

Oct 21, 2011

Oliver Miles, a former British Ambassador to Libya, talks to Renee Montagne about the reaction in Britain, and France to the death of former Libyan ruler Moammar Gadhafi. What does his death mean for Europe's future role in Libya?

The MTV reality show The Real World posted an ad on Craigslist earlier this week seeking Occupy Wall Street protesters as cast members. The news blog "Talking Points Memo" picked up on the posting, and called the production company to confirm. An executive there said the protest is "something that's in the zeitgeist of young people."

Walmart To Cut Back On Employee Healthcare

Oct 21, 2011

The nation's largest private employer will no longer provide a healthcare plan for new part-time employees, according to The New York Times. Walmart is also raising premiums for many full-time staff. The reason is rising costs, according to a company spokesman quoted in the story.

Japan's Uniqlo Eyes Manhattan, And More

Oct 21, 2011

At the same time that Gap is closing 20 percent of its stores, a big Japanese clothing retailer called Uniqlo plans to open hundreds of shops in the U.S. Uniqlo is sort of like the Gap of Japan: The low-priced casual clothing retailer has been around since the 1980s, but sales are flattening out in its home market so the company is looking overseas for growth.

The U.S. is at the heart of its strategy, according to the head of Uniqlo's U.S. operation, Shin Odake.

Tomorrow is the 200th birthday of composer and pianist Franz Liszt. Morning Edition's music commentator Miles Hoffman thinks there are plenty of reasons to celebrate.

"This is a man who lived an extraordinarily long and an extraordinarily productive life — a very complicated life," Hoffman says "By many accounts he was the greatest pianist of the 19th century, somebody who revolutionized people's ideas of what was possible on the piano."

Life As A 'Symbol Of Integration' In College

Oct 21, 2011

In 1953, A.P. Tureaud Jr. enrolled as a freshman at Louisiana State University, becoming the school's first and only black undergraduate that year. His family had filed a lawsuit on his behalf, after his first application to the school was rejected because of his race. And, as Tureaud remembers, life on the campus in Baton Rouge was a challenge.

Tureaud, 75, talked about the experience with his friend, Steven Walkley, 62.

Giant Cellphone Bill Shocks Florida Woman

Oct 20, 2011

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ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Ari Shapiro.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

There might be no bluegrass music as we know it without Wade Mainer, who died Monday at his home in Flint, Mich., Sept. 12 at age 104.

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