Marketplace from APM

Mon-Fri 6:30PM – 7PM
  • Hosted by Kai Ryssdal

American Public Media's Marketplace presents news on business, economics, and money for the rest of us.

More info on Marketplace

In West, Feds control land — and lots of jobs

20 hours ago
Teen%20participants%20in%20Rodeo%20Bible%20Camp%20practice%20roping%20a%20mechanical%20calf%20at%20the%20Goldendale%2C%20Washington%20fairgrounds_0.JPG
Mitchell Hartman

A federal trial is underway in Portland, Ore., of people  charged in connection with the armed occupation of the Malheur Wildlife Refuge in rural  Oregon. Ammon and Ryan Bundy—sons of anti-government Nevada rancher Cliven Bundy—are among those charged with conspiracy and firearms violations for the takeover of the remote federal refuge near Burns, in Harney County,  in early 2016.

GettyImages-465330441.jpg
Kai Ryssdal

Look, I'm never gonna be mistaken for anybody's musical taste-maker, but this isn't so bad, right?

Keeping traditional morning news alive, without the TV

Sep 26, 2016
Zakin%20and%20Weisberg%20theSkimm.jpg
Kai Ryssdal and Daisy Palacios

Not that The New York Times is the be-all and end-all of the news business, but it's got a certain cachet. So when it invests in a company that was built – at least in the beginning – on a conversational, but very newsy morning email aimed at millennial women, people pay attention.

Prostate cancer treatments in question

Sep 26, 2016
GettyImages-457765766.jpg
D Gorenstein

New findings show that after 10 years, the survival rate for low-risk prostate cancer is an identical 99 percent no matter what a patient does: surgery, radiation or nothing.

It’s pretty rare for research to show so starkly that doctors should do fewer procedures, and as a therefore decrease costs to the overall healthcare system. An interesting question is whether this research will convince patients like Marc Biagini and his doctors of this: less can be more.

About a month ago Biagini picked up the phone.

Snapchat...but for your face

Sep 26, 2016
GettyImages-586113582.jpg
Kai Ryssdal

Snapchat has changed its name to Snap Inc. The company also announced its first wearable, called "Spectacles." Like the name says, its a pair of glasses that record video. Senior tech correspondent Molly Wood explains why wearable video capture is as obvious as the nose on your face. 

The company needs to grow:

"There's only so long that Snapchat alone, the sort of fun messaging company, can sustain you, so they're doing this very interesting and I would argue, related, growth strategy into capture, into cameras."

GettyImages-472769050_0.jpg
Tony Wagner

Texas Sen. Ted Cruz endorsed his bitter primary rival and Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump just last week, but he's made thousands renting out his supporters' email addresses to Trump for months.

Debate 1: Clinton, Trump and "achieving prosperity"

Sep 26, 2016

Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump are head to head for this, their first presidential debate, on Monday, Sept 26, 2016. The Marketplace team weighs in throughout the night.

rollingstone.jpg
Lane Wallace

Rolling Stone Magazine is selling a 49 percent stake to BandLab, a music startup in Singapore.

That comes as print ad sales are down for the magazine, and it continues pushing its digital presence. The magazine, which built its reputation decades ago on its counterculture appeal and gonzo reporting style, has maintained some heavy-hitting reporting and a focus on the music industry even as it’s become significantly more mainstream.

Oculus Rift founder apologizes for funding pro-Trump group

Sep 26, 2016

On today's show, we'll talk about Rolling Stone's decision to sell 49 percent of its stake to a music startup based in Singapore; why the U.S. Department of Education will no longer recognize the largest accreditor of for-profit colleges; and an apology from Palmer Luckey, the CEO of Oculus Rift, for funding a group that supports Trump.

quinonez.png
David Brancaccio

Of the 23 winners of the MacArthur 'genius' grants announced last Friday, one recipient was honored for financial innovation. Jose Quinoñez, founder and CEO of the San Francisco-based Mission Asset Fund, works with low-income people who often do not have bank accounts or much data in their credit files.

Pages