Marketplace from APM

Mon-Fri 6:30PM – 7PM
  • Hosted by Kai Ryssdal

American Public Media's Marketplace presents news on business, economics, and money for the rest of us.

More info on Marketplace

Scott Cohn

Wildfires are an unfortunate fact of life in California, and a five-year drought is only making matters worse. Since the beginning of this year, more than 5,300 fires have broken out in the state. That is a 16 percent jump from a year ago.

Starbucks doubles down on China

8 hours ago
Reema Khrais

Starbucks named executive Belinda Wong as its first CEO for China this week, and said it plans to have 5,000 stores in the country by 2021. With a middle class that is already larger than the population of the United States, China could be Starbucks' growth engine of the future.  

Click the above audio player to hear the full story. 

Will honey bees stay sweet on North Dakota?

9 hours ago
Annie Baxter

It might seem surprising that North Dakota, one of the northernmost and coldest states in the nation, is the bees’ knees for honey production.

It produces more honey than any other state. In summertime, North Dakota's climate is just right. It's conducive to flowers’ production of nectar, which bees use to make honey.

“Warm days and cool nights are optimal for nectar secretion for a number of plants that honeybees visit. So that helps,” said Mark Sperry, owner of Sperry Apiaries in Kindred, North Dakota.

Marketplace Tech for Friday, October 21, 2016

10 hours ago

On today's show, we'll interview the CEO of Emotiv about the company's EEG headsets, a type of hardware that could one day be used  for everything from teaching better focus to controlling robotic limbs. Plus, we'll also play this week's Silicon Tally with Greta Johnsen, the co-host of the Nerdette podcast and a reporter and anchor at WBEZ.

If you can't pay bail, aren't you unfairly incarcerated?

22 hours ago
Sabri Ben-Achour

Does bail discriminate?

There are around 450,000 Americans in jail who haven't been convicted of a crime. How many of them are there because they are poor is hotly contested and varies from place to place. Data from Los Angeles suggest it's 14 percent there. A New Jersey study from 2013 put the number at 39 percent, advocates say it's higher. By any measure it's tens of thousands of people on any given day.

Soon, the house next door could be a rental

23 hours ago
Mitchell Hartman

According to ATTOM Data Solutions’ Single-Family Rental Market Report for Q3 2016, approximately 25 percent of single-family homes in the U.S. are owned by investors and rented out, rather than occupied by their owners.

ATTOM senior vice president Daren Blomquist said that purchases of properties in 2015 were even more investor-driven, with approximately one-third of single-family homes being purchased by investors.

What does it take to start a network, anyway?

23 hours ago
Gigi Douban

Before last night’s presidential debate, Republican Donald Trump had a pre-game show all his own on Facebook Live.  Now there is speculation Mr. Trump is considering Trump TV. Which made us wonder, what does it take to get a brand new network off the ground? 

Number one, a brand. But a little caution: Oprah Winfrey had a brand and a popular syndicated talk show. But it took OWN four years and $500 million in investment before it turned a profit.  

Sam Craig, heads of NYU’s Entertainment, Media, and Technology program, said it takes years to build an audience.

Silicon Valley's answer to brain fog

23 hours ago
Molly Wood

In a competitive market, everyone is looking for an edge to keep them going throughout the workday. But sometimes, another cup of coffee just doesn't do the trick. Now, there's a subscription service called Nootrobox, which is filled with pills designed to enhance cognition. Alex Morris, a contributing editor at New York Magazine, profiled the company in a piece titled "The Pill Freaks of Silicon Valley," and spoke with Marketplace's Molly Wood. 

Let's do the numbers... on the debt

Oct 20, 2016
Nancy Marshall-Genzer

The thing about numbers:  you can slice and dice them to support whatever point you’re trying to make.  Politicians are especially good at that.

When University of Georgia economist William Lastrapes sees this, he just shakes his head.

“When politicians start talking about the federal government debt, it’s very easy to talk about the big numbers," he said. "But you need to keep those numbers in perspective.”

Donald Trump's economic numbers still don't add up

Oct 20, 2016
Tony Wagner

When he wasn't creating memes or, as the Associated Press put it, "threatening to upend a fundamental pillar of American democracy" at last night's presidential debate, Donald Trump returned to some old economic hobby horses.