All Things Considered from NPR

Mon-Fri 4PM – 6PM
Robert Siegel, Audie Cornish, Melissa Block

Each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

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Around the Nation
5:33 pm
Sun November 6, 2011

Small Elections Drawing Big Money In Some States

A few years ago, in Wake County, N.C., Kevin Hill wanted to get involved in his community, so he ran for his local school board.

The campaign team consisting of Hill and his wife, with the help of some friends, raised about $6,000; he won the seat in the 2007 election. He's hoping to retain that seat in a runoff election Tuesday, but this time his campaign is a little bigger.

"[It went] from me and my wife to about 300 people," Hill says. "It's been mind-boggling to me that, for a school board race that is nonpartisan, the amounts of money that has been raised."

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Three-Minute Fiction
3:21 pm
Sun November 6, 2011

Three-Minute Fiction Winners: Where Are They Now?

Courtesy of Zach Brockhouse

Originally published on Sun November 6, 2011 6:59 pm

Three-Minute Fiction is All Things Considered's creative writing contest where our listeners submit an original short story that can be read in about three minutes — 600 words — or less. After weeks of reading a couple thousand submissions, a judge picks a winning story. Over the last two years, contestants have submitted about 29,000 stories, and only six have won.

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Latin America
3:00 pm
Sun November 6, 2011

In Nicaragua, Ortega Poised For Re-Election

Originally published on Sun November 6, 2011 6:59 pm

Transcript

LAURA SULLIVAN, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Laura Sullivan.

It's Election Day in Nicaragua where President Daniel Ortega is running for an unprecedented third term. The country's constitution sets a two-term limit, but the Supreme Court declared that unconstitutional. The longtime Sandinistan leader has been leading in the polls. NPR's Jason Beaubien reports from Managua.

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Latin America
3:00 pm
Sun November 6, 2011

Nicaragua, Guatemala: '80s Rebels Seek Leadership

Originally published on Sun November 6, 2011 6:59 pm

Transcript

LAURA SULLIVAN, HOST:

Nicaragua isn't the only country in Central America holding elections today. In Guatemala, people are also headed to the polls to choose a new president. And in both countries, the elections are fraught with history.

Back in the 1980s, Guatemala and Nicaragua were facing civil war and revolution. Twenty-five years later, both countries are still embattled but with different issues.

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Interviews
3:00 pm
Sun November 6, 2011

What Do Occupy Wall Street Protesters Want?

Originally published on Sun November 6, 2011 6:59 pm

Transcript

LAURA SULLIVAN, HOST:

Occupy Wall Street is in its second month of protest, and the frustration with financial big wigs continues to grow. Tomorrow's protesters will track 11 miles from Upper Manhattan to Lower Manhattan, ending in Zuccotti Park, the place where it all started seven weeks ago. They're calling the walk End to End for 99%.

These events are becoming a familiar sight to bankers looking down from their high-rise windows onto the tent city below. But what's Wall Street really thinking about the so-called 99 percent just outside their offices?

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Music
4:48 pm
Sat November 5, 2011

From Samba To Flamenco, A Latin Grammy Preview

The Los Angeles band La Santa Cecilia is nominated in the Best Tropical Song category at this year's Latin Grammys.
Rene Miranda Courtesy of the artist

The 2011 Latin Grammy Awards will take place this Thursday in Las Vegas. For those unfamiliar with the categories and nominees, Betto Arcos of KPFK's Global Village returns to weekends on All Things Considered to play songs from a few of his favorite nominated performers. Included are a samba artist best known for his film role as a singing sailor, the reigning king of flamenco, one of Mexico's biggest bands and an L.A. ensemble that channels the various sounds of its city.

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Author Interviews
3:29 pm
Sat November 5, 2011

A Tale Of Forgiveness From The Tragedy Of Masada

Alice Hoffman is the author of more than 30 books.
Deborah Feingold alicehoffman.com

Originally published on Sat November 5, 2011 6:33 pm

When Jerusalem fell in 70 AD, hundreds of Jews journeyed through the desert and settled in the haven of Masada. In what is now southern Israel, Masada was an old fortress of King Herod's that sits atop an enormous rock plateau surrounded by steep cliffs.

"When I was there, I felt so moved and so connected," author Alice Hoffman tells Laura Sullivan, guest host of weekends on All Things Considered.

Hoffman was so struck by the beauty of Masada's rocky terrain, she says, that she chose to make it the backdrop in her new novel, The Dovekeepers.

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Art & Design
2:54 pm
Sat November 5, 2011

The Red Solo Cup: Every Party's Most Popular Guest

In 2009, the red Solo cup got extra grips and a square bottom.
Courtesy of Solo Cup Co.

Originally published on Sat November 5, 2011 6:44 pm

On most Saturday nights in college towns across the country, students get ready to party. The one thing all those parties will likely have in common — besides the keg, of course — is a stack of red plastic cups.

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Europe
7:03 pm
Fri November 4, 2011

Greek Prime Minister Survives Confidence Vote

Greek Prime Minister George Papandreou survived a confidence vote in parliament. For more, Guy Raz talks to NPR's Sylvia Poggioli, who is in Athens.

Presidential Race
4:30 pm
Fri November 4, 2011

Lawyer For Cain Accuser Issues Statement

The lawyer for one of the women who have received settlements after filing sexual harassment complaints against GOP presidential candidate Herman Cain released a public statement. It rebuts Cain's statements that the claim was baseless. Robert Siegel talks to NPR's Tamara Keith for more.

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